Gg

gabarn-na       
coverb (intr.)
 
to be fast, quickly
Yawey wuji nga-ngan-nawu-ng garradin gabarn-na gahan mamin. 'Yes, that white man did not give me the money quickly.' (LM, text)
Gabarn mi-di! 'Come quickly!' (PH)
Gaba-gabarn mi-di! 'Come really quickly!' (LM)
gadamalga       
nominal
 
stone spear
 
see also jimbilang.
gahan       
demonstrative
stem gay- ~ gayh- (HL); plural gay-gorden ~ gayh-gorden (HL)
   1.
that, the
Humbug ngan-yaha-ny gahan marluga. 'That old man humbugged me.' (LM, text)
Bicycle gay-giwu, ngi-ga-jan-guju magu. 'We used to take those two bicycles over there.' (LM)
Bunggu-bu-ni yonggorn-na gay-gorden lagiban. Gay-gunda now dowh-ma bunggu-bu-ni. 'The Aboriginal men struck at them first. Because of that, they shot them.' (LM, text)
   2.
there
Nga-ya-nggi jorro-ma gahan. 'I went back there.' (LM, text)
gahanan       
locative nominal
 
that way
Jamba gi-ya-ngana gahanan. Mahanan gi-ya-ngana. 'We can't go that way. We'll go this way.' (LM)
gajirri       
nominal
 
woman
Nibulin ya-nggi nung gahan gajirri. 'She was his girlfriend, that woman.' (LM)
gakgalak       
nominal
   1.
moon
Gakgalak werrh-ma ga-di-n. 'The moon is coming up.' (LM)
   2.
month
Bornh ga-ba-ge-n wah-ba, ga-ba-bula-n gakgalak. 'They put it in the water, and leave it for a month.' (HL, text)
   3.
moon snake, legless lizard sp. Lialis burtonis
gakgawurin       
nominal
stem gakgawur-
 
long yam Diascorea transversa
Bulu-buluman gakgawurin ngi-ma-jan. 'We used to get very big long yams.' (LM, text)
 
note: The yam of this plant is long and sometimes quite large. The flesh can be eaten raw, boiled or roasted, and is considered very good.
 
see also jambu.
galagala       
nominal
 
gall
 
see also dordokgin.
galambu       
nominal
 
northern quoll, also called native cat Dasyurus hallucatus
Gahan galambu yaha-ny "yimbama-wu gu-bort-da-ja gahan!" 'The native cat said "people will die for good!"' (LM, text)
 
note: An excellent hunter that preys on lizards, rats and other small animals. It also likes to eat sugarbag.
 
see also wayibin.
galanduk       
nominal
 
yam sp. Trichoglochin dubium
galatj       
nominal
 
younger brother or sister
Mahan nganing-gin galatj. 'He's my younger brother.' (PH)
galbanyin       
nominal
 
green plum Buchanania obovata
Gin-ya lewa-yan galbanyin-gu. 'We're looking for green plum.' (HL)
 
note: This is highly valued and sought-after bush tucker. The fruit are eaten when they are ripe: green but soft to the touch. The entire fruit - seeds, skin and flesh - can be pounded up and then eaten. This pulp can also be made into a damper. Alternatively, the fruit can be dried in the sun. It then lasts a long time, and also tastes sweeter. However, this is less common; the fruit are generally collected from the ground and eaten immediately. The fruit are produced in the middle of the wet season. Sometimes they occur in massive numbers and hundreds can be collected from a single tree.
galbarra       
nominal
variant galbarrin (HL, opt.)
 
northern brown bandicoot Isoodon macrourus
Galbarra ngarrme-ba ga-ba-yu guk-ga. 'Bandicoots live in hollow logs.' (LM)
 
note: These animals are often seen hunting for insects and roots after dark. They can be killed for meat when they are sitting on their grass nests, by hitting them with a stick. The flesh is roasted on hot coals and ashes after the guts are removed, and is very tasty and tender.
galbun       
nominal
variant galborn (HL)
 
whistling kite Haliastur sphenurus
galgarun       
nominal
   1.
bamboo sp. Phragmites vallatoria
   2.
short bamboo spear
galhgal       
nominal
dialect HL, PH
 
sitting
Galhgal nga-ga-n berlin-leying wayi-tjjalbu. 'I'm carrying the kid on my shoulder.' (PH)
 
see also galh-ma.
galh-ma       
coverb (tr.)
 
to climb
Galh-ma ngi-ya-ngga-jan garradin. 'We climbed the hill.' (HL)
Ngan-galh-ma-yi nguyan-yi nardal. 'The ant climbed my finger.' (GH)
 
see also galhgal.
galijana       
nominal
dialect PH
 
black wattle Acacia auriculiformis
 
note: The leaves and fruit can be rubbed between the hands with a little water to make a soapy lather. The leaves and fruit can also be used as fish poison.
galikgin       
nominal
 
silky oak Grevillea pteridifolia
 
note: This tree has large orange flowers which contain sweet nectar. This can be sucked from the flowers and it is very tasty. The leaves can be used to improve the flavour of meat which is being roasted. Fresh leaves are placed in a ground oven with the meat, where they help to keep it moist and tender.
galin       
nominal
 
ironwood wax
Galin, garnin-gu, nap-ba ge-ge-n garnin. 'Ironwood wax is used to stick spears together.' (HL)
 
see also wumirr, nerran.
galkgu       
nominal
 
cluster fig Ficus racemosa
 
note: The fruit can be eaten when ripe: orange with reddish stripes. However it is not considered very tasty, so it is normally only eaten when people are particularly hungry. Turtles and some fish also eat the fruit when they fall into creeks and billabongs.
galp-bu-yan       
n.f. verb (impfv., tr.)
also galp-bu-yh n.f. pfv
 
wiping
Gidurtdal galp-bu-yan nga-ma-ji-ng. 'I wiped my nose.' (LM)
Galp-bu-yh mee-ji gidurtdal! 'Wipe your nose!' (LM)
galwunin       
nominal
 
green tree snake Dendrelaphis punctulatus
gambangay       
nominal
dialect LM
 
firefly
 
see also linmulinmu.
ganborlbolin       
nominal
dialect LL
 
turkey bush Calytrix exstipulata
ga-ndi       
infl. verb (tr.)
root -ga-; past -ndi; ppfv -ng
 
to take, to carry
Boss larima, nginggu-ga-ndi gay-ba, lah-leying. 'The two bosses took us back to the camp.' (LM, text)
Wihya wuji nga-nga-ga-ndi gahan nendo! 'No, I didn't take that horse!' (LM, text)
 
see also wunh-na1.
gangaman       
nominal
variant gangahman (HL)
stem gangama-
 
antilopine kangaroo Macropus antilopinus
Nyukgin ga-ba-da, gangama-yi. 'Kangaroos eat sugarbag grass.' (LM)
 
see also garndalu, yunumburrgu.
gangan       
nominal
dialect HL, PH
   1.
fire-tailed lizard Morethia storri
   2.
skink sp. Carlia gracilis
gangga       
nominal
variant ganggaran (HL)
 
upriver
Magu ga-ba-ya-guju gangga. 'That way those two are going, upriver.' (LM)
Magu ganggaran ya-nginy, gorrh-ma, majal-gu. 'He went fishing upriver.' (HL)
ganggilang       
nominal
 
tobacco plug
ganjel-ma       
coverb (intr.)
dialect HL
 
to sit on your haunches
 
see also durdih-ma.
gan-na       
coverb (intr.)
   1.
to get lost
Gan-na nga-ya-nginy. 'I got lost.' (HL)
   2.
to misrecognise
Walya gan-na nga-ya-nggi-ma. Niji nganing-gin ngaha-ny nung, gan-na nga-ma-yi. 'I misrecognised him. I thought he was my uncle, but I was mistaken.' (LM)
ganya       
particle
 
also, too
Lihwa-tjjondony gahan lagiban ma-bu-min. Jilimakgun ganya. 'That man is no good, I'll belt him. His wife too.' (LM)
 
see also nyama.
ganyimiyan       
nominal
stem ganyimiya-
 
that kind
Lihwa ganyimiyan 'That kind of thing is no good.' (LM, text)
Nga-ma-jan ganyimiyan bakga nga-ga-jan jorro-ma ala nganing-gin. 'I used to get that kind of tobacco and take it back to my mother.' (LM)
gapbut       
nominal
 
tomorrow
Gapbut gi-ya-ngana. 'We'll go tomorrow.' (LM, text)
 
see also gapbutgapbut, gapbut neyenggun.
gapbut neyenggun       
nominal
 
another day
Jamba gi-ya-ngana gahan lahan. Gapbut neyenggun gin-ya. 'We can't go to that place. We'll go another day.' (LM)
 
see also gapbut, neyenggun.
gapbutgapbut       
nominal
   1.
yesterday
Gapbutgapbut di-nya gahan marluga. 'Yesterday the old man came.' (LM)
   2.
morning
Maman nga-ya-nggi gapbutgapbut. Lawh-ma nga-ni-nginy maman nga-ya-nggi wilh-ma. 'I felt good this morning. I got up and went for a good walk.' (LM)
 
see also gawor-ubawo, gapbut.
gara       
nominal
 
dilly bag
garanggi       
nominal
 
mad
Bulkgu-bulkgu wurrububu, ngurru-yi ga-na-n gordal-ma ga-durdurt-da-n. Garanggi ga-na-n gordal. 'He runs around in the heat of the middle of the day. He is mad.' (LM)
garingal       
nominal
 
star
Longon-nehen, wolok garingal ga-yu, nga-nanda-n garingal. 'When there are no clouds, I can see the stars in the sky.' (HL)
garlarr       
nominal
variant galara (HL)
 
dilly bag
garlinyjin       
nominal
dialect HL, PH, LL
 
wild orange Capparis umbonata
 
note: The fruit can be eaten when they are ripe: pale green and soft to the touch. The fruit contain many seeds and the flesh is sweet and tasty.
garnamalin       
nominal
 
cheeky yam Amorphophallus paeoniifolius
Gahan now ngi-de-jan, garnamalin, gakgawurin. 'We used to eat cheeky yams and long yams.' (LM, text)
 
note: The large yam can be dug up, cleaned and eaten. It needs extensive preparation, but when correctly prepared, it has a pleasant sweet taste. In the past, the large yams were cooked in the ground, or in water left over from preparing corned beef. Some of the yams are too "cheeky" to prepare for eating. The edibility of the yam is checked before it is dug up. The leaf is rubbed with water or spit and if it gives a sparkling appearance this shows that it can't be eaten, so it is left in the ground. The juice from the yam, stem and leaves is dangerous, and can cause severe skin irritation. Pigs eat the yams in large numbers and are responsible for the decline in numbers of this yam.
 
see also ngalyunginy.
garnanganyjan       
nominal
 
emu Dromaius novaehollandiae
 
note: In the past large groups of emus were fairly common, but now they are rarely seen. The flesh can be eaten and is very tasty. It is cooked in a large ground oven. The guts are taken out and hot stones are placed inside. Paperbark leaves are used to flavour the meat. The eggs can also be cooked and eaten. In the past, emus were hunted with spears. The hunter would be covered with mud to hide his smell. He would hide near a waterhole, near a track, or in a black plum tree, and spear the emu as it came in.
garnany-nya       
coverb (intr.)
 
(meaning unclear)
Balp-ba ma-yi durrin, garnany badi-ng-ma lagarra. 'He trod on a snake, and it bit him on the leg.' (LM)
 
note: It is not yet known what this word means.
garnarr-ma       
coverb (intr.)
dialect HL, PH
 
to rustle
Garnarr-ma ga-di-n. 'He's coming along rustling in the leaves.' (PH)
garnbik       
nominal
 
clapstick
garndabak-ga       
coverb (tr.)
variant garnabak-ga (HL)
 
to hit from behind with a weapon
Garndabak nga-bu-ng wirin, majanga-yi. 'I belted him from behind with a nulla-nulla.' (LM)
garndalu       
nominal
 
doe kangaroo Macropus antilopinus
Garndalu ga-ga-n warren, mahan-gu bip-ba ga-ga-n bindal-ba. 'Doe kangaroos carry their young in their pouches.' (LM)
 
see also gangaman, yunumburrgu.
garnditjjin       
nominal
 
worms
Garnditjjin, gi-ma-n-ngana, gorrh-may-gu. 'We'll get worms for fishing.' (LM)
garndukwu       
nominal
variant garndukgu (HL, PH)
 
oldest brother
garnin       
nominal
stem garn-
   1.
spear
note: This is a general word for all kinds of spears.
Ma-re-ja gahan gangaman, garnin-garang. 'I'm going to spear that kangaroo.' (PH)
   2.
snake sp.
garninyjan       
nominal
 
wattle spp. Acacia difficilis, platycarpa & oncinocarpa
Garninyjan, wah-ba bornh-na ga-ba-ge-n, dorroh-ma ga-ba-ma-n, wirin, majalin bort ga-baa. 'They put wattle in the water, take it out again, and the fish all die.' (HL)
 
note: The stems of straight plants can be used to make small spear shafts. The stringy bark can be pulled off in long strips, and used for typing up wood, swags, and so on. The flowers and spikes of Acacia oncinocarpa can be ground up and used as "fish poison". This is thrown in the water, then the fish float to the surface and can be easily collected, cooked and eaten.
garnmurrin       
nominal
 
woollybutt Eucalyptus miniata & phoenicea
 
note: A small fire can be made from the flaky bark and used to heat the bends in spear shafts to allow them to be straightened. The hollow stems and branches can be used to make didgeridoos. Sugarbag (native bee-hives), which contain honey, wax and pollen, are often found in this tree. There are two types of garnmurrin: Eucalyptus miniata has yellowish bark and occurs on sandy plains, and Eucalyptus phoenicea has darker bark and occurs on elevated sandstone areas.
garradin       
nominal
stem garra-
   1.
rock
Ga-yu wurnka-ma gahan lahan. Garradin-garradin-garang. Wut-da ngi-ma-ny-guju. 'That country is lonely. It is rocky. We didn't like it.' (LM, text)
Gahan garradin gangama-yiga ga-yu, gahan buluman gijalkgin. 'That rock looks like a kangaroo, that big limestone rock.' (LM)
   2.
hill
Galh ngi-yama-ny-guju gahan garradin. 'Us two climbed the hill.' (LM, text)
   3.
money
"Garradin gi-gondo-n?" "Wihya, ngagun wihya, garra-nehen nga-ya." '"Do you have any money?" "No, not me, I have no money."' (LM, text)
garramben       
nominal
 
blue-winged kookaburra Dacelo leachii
Nganku lamang garramben, karrawok karrawok karrawok karrawok, gahan-ma ga-jewo-n martdal, martdal lagiban-gunda, ga-ba-jewo-n-ma mangima-yi. 'When the kookaburra sings out, it means that the police are tracking someone.' (LM)
 
see also garrwukgarrwuk.
garrardarda       
nominal
 
breastplate
garratjjin       
nominal
 
spear grass Sorghum spp.
Garratjjin, dorro-dorroh ngi-ma-ny-guju dabali. 'We pulled out the spear grass all around.' (LM, text)
 
note: The stages of growth of garratjjin indicate different seasonal cycles to the Wagiman people.
garreng       
nominal
dialect HL, PH, LL
 
mother
Garreng nganing-gin gornkorn-na gi-ya-giwu. 'My mother and I are talking.' (PH)
 
see also ngal-garreng, ngala, ngalagunin.
garrkgany       
nominal
 
brown goshawk, also called chickenhawk Accipiter fasciatus
garrwukgarrwuk       
nominal
 
blue-winged kookaburra Dacelo leachii
 
see also garramben.
gartdan       
nominal
 
milky plum Persoonia falcata
 
note: The fruit can be eaten when they are ripe: green but soft to the touch.
gartgart-da       
coverb (intr.)
 
to laugh
Gartgart-da ngi-yu-nginy nung-ma, ngagun biyakgin-giwu. 'We laughed at her, me and my sister.' (LM, text)
 
see also nu-gartgart.
gatjjin       
nominal
 
hawk sp.
gawor       
nominal
 
afternoon
Ma-ya-min gorrh-ma menuny gawor. 'Maybe I will go fishing this afternoon.' (HL, text)
gawor-ubawo       
nominal
dialect PH
 
yesterday
Gawor-ubawo nyongh-nga ni-nginy, gahan wayi-tjjalbu. 'Yesterday he was sick, that kid.' (PH)
 
see also gapbutgapbut.
gawu       
nominal
   1.
grandmother (mother's mother)
Gawu-ya ga-ba-di-n-guju. 'Grandmother and a grandchild are coming up.' (LM)
   2.
grandchild (from a woman to her daughter's children)
 
see also ngal-gawu, ngal-gawu-mang.
gawurdu       
particle
   1.
enough
Nungarin gornkorn-na gi-ya-ngga-jan-ngana, gawurdu nyenh-na gi-yebe-jan. 'We should have just talked once, then enough, we should have stayed quiet.' (HL, text)
   2.
finished
Gawurdu ngaha ngorroju-giwu now? 'I've finished talking to you two now?' (CM, text)
 
see also yilkgawu.
gawuyarra       
interjection
 
good job
Gawuyarra warren gerdo-gin-ngana ba-di-nya-guju jorro-ma. 'Good job our two kids have come back.' (LM, text)
 
note: This meaning is uncertain.
gayh-ma       
coverb (intr.)
 
to sing out, yell out, call out
Gahan mamin jumbany-wu di-nya gayh yaha-ny ngerreju. 'The white man came behind and sang out to us.' (LM, text)
gelberre       
nominal
dialect HL, PH, LL
variants galberre (PH), gelbe (LL)
 
goanna sp. Varanus baritji
geletj-ja       
coverb (intr.)
 
to be the new moon
Geletj la-ng gakgalak. 'The moon is new.' (PH)
gelgel-ma       
coverb (intr.)
dialect HL, PH
 
to be shiny
Gelgel-ma ga-yu, nimurdal. 'She's got shiny teeth.' (PH)
 
see also ma-gelgel.
gelyengh-nga       
coverb (intr.)
 
to cough
Jahan-gu gelyengh-gelyengh gi-ya-ma? Ngeyngey-yi gunyju-ma-n? 'Why are you coughing? Have you got a cold?' (LM)
 
see also ngutjjurh-ma.
gelyeng-nga       
coverb (intr.)
 
to be raw
Mahan gelyeng-nga-wu ga-yu lamang. Wuji ga-na-ni. 'This meat is raw. It has not been cooked.' (LM)
ge-na       
infl. verb (tr.)
root -ge-; past -na; ppfv -ng; fut vowel can change to i
   1.
to put
Guda-leying garradin ba-ge-na. 'They put the rocks on the fire.' (PH)
Lawel ngan-ge-na-ma, nganing-gin bohbo-yi. 'My auntie dressed me (put clothes on me).' (LM)
Balarrin ge-na nganung burrhburr-ma ma-ya-min. 'He put white ochre on me, I will dance.' (LM)
Jimirndirr nganing-gin barri-ba yurrh-ma ngu-ge-na? 'My knife, where have you lot hidden it?'
   2.
to plant
Nganku custard apple nge-ge-na mahan. 'We planted custard apples here.' (LM, text)
   3.
to cause (in complex predicates)
Ngal-martdiwa gahan, borndedi gahan dabunyh-nya ge-na. 'The old lady filled the billycan.'
Guda gahan bort nge-ge-ng? 'Did you put the fire out?'
gengelk       
nominal
 
wattle sp. Acacia leptocarpa
 
note: When this tree produces yellow flowers, it indicates that turtles will have laid their eggs, so they can be dug up, cooked and eaten.
gengh-nga       
coverb (tr.)
 
to choke
Gengh-nga ma-yi neyenggun marluga. 'He choked the other old man.' (LM)
Gengh-nga ma-ji-na. 'He choked himself.' (LM)
gerdo-gin       
pronoun
variant ngerdo-gin (HL, opt.)
1pl. genitive
 
our, ours
Gahan-di gerdo-gin warren me-gondo may-laying! 'They're our kids and we're going to keep them here!' (LM)
gerr-ma       
coverb (tr.)
 
to twist
Mahan martdal gerr-ma nga-ma-ji-ng. 'I twisted my foot.' (LM)
getder       
nominal
 
red lily Nelumbo nucifera
getj-ja       
coverb (tr.)
 
to ask
Nganing-gin ngal-warlang-yi getj-ja ngan-ge-na garradin-gu. 'My wife asked me for money' (PH)
Garra-gu nga-ba-getj-ja-n. 'I'll ask them for money.' (HL)
Gahan labingan getj-ja-yan ya-nggi dangany-gu. 'That kid was asking for tucker.' (LM)
 
see also ngorrk-ga.
getna       
coverb (tr.)
variant gitna (HL)
does not take the -ma suffix
 
to give a good hiding
Wuji ga-nga-ja wihya. Getna ma-bu! 'He doesn't listen. I'll give him a good hiding!' (LM)
gidik-ga       
coverb (tr.)
 
to tickle
Gidik-ga-yan ga-ba-ma-ji-n-giwu. 'They're tickling each other.' (PH)
 
see also nu-gidik-ga.
gidurtdal       
nominal
   1.
nose
Gidurtdal gururu-ma nga-yu. 'My nose is running.' (PH)
   2.
face
Jern-yi ginggu-bu-n-ngana gidurtdal. 'The smoke is getting in our faces.' (LM)
gijalkgin       
nominal
 
limestone
Worrok-gay-gu ga-yu gahan gijalkgin. 'Limestone is used for washing.' (LM)
giminy       
nominal
   1.
gum
Giminy, bak gi-ma-n giminy wir-gunda. Damorom-ba lem ge-ge-n, jungh-jungh-jungh-jungh gi-ga-n. 'You get gum from a tree. You put it in your mouth, and suck on it.' (HL)
   2.
camel tree
ginahan       
locative nominal
 
somewhere
Ga-ba-guk-ga-n ginahan marak-ba. 'They're sleeping somewhere in the leaves.' (HL)
ginaman       
nominal
 
poor thing
Yawey, ginaman, ba-bu-ni. Berrh ba-ra-ng gay-leying, gijalkgin, lem-lem, bunggu-re-na. 'Yes, poor things, they shot them. They threw them in the limestone cave.' (LM, text)
ginawiying       
locative nominal
 
somewhere
Magu ginawiying nga-bula-ndi bakga. 'I left the tobacco somewhere over there.' (HL)
ginkin-na       
coverb (intr.)
 
to make a roaring noise
ginmarrin       
nominal
variant ginhmarrin (HL)
 
tendon
ginwurrin       
nominal
variant ginurrin (HL, PH)
stem ginwu-
 
mucus, snot
Ngeyngey lihwa-tjjondony nga-gondo-n. Nu-dardatj-ja ga-ya gahan ginwurrin. 'I have a bad cold. The mucus is hard.' (LM)
gipmun       
nominal
dialect HL, PH
 
wax
girribuk       
nominal
 
Torresian imperial pigeon Ducula spilorrhoa
git-da       
coverb (tr.)
 
to stab
Git ba-ra-ng-ma gahan lagiban, jimirndirr-garang. 'They stabbed that man with a knife.' (LM)
gitjjiya       
nominal
   1.
today
Ma-dipba wahan gitjjiya mahan gu-rinyi-min. 'I will make it rain here today.' (LM, text)
   2.
now
Ah jamba gu-ya-ma! Gu-yu-ngana gitjjiya! 'Ah don't you lot go! You lot stay now!' (LM, text)
giwurrk-ga       
coverb (intr.)
 
to sulk
Jahan-gu giwurrk-giwurrk gi-ya? Many-bu-yarra getna-ma! 'Why are you sulking? I'll give you a hiding!' (LM)
giyak1       
nominal
 
law
Giyak-leying ga-ba-ge-n, mululuk. 'They put him through the law, an initiate.' (LM)
giyak2       
nominal
variant giyak-gin (HL opt., PH)
 
rubbish
Giyak-giyak ga-ba-yu dul-ma minyga-minyga, lah-leying. 'There is rubbish lying all over the camp.' (LM)
giyakgiyak       
nominal
 
everything
Laundry, worrok-worrok sheet-buga, labali, lari labali, clothes nganku. Giyakgiyak worrok-ga ngi-ma-jan. 'In the laundry we washed sheets, trousers, shirts, clothes, what's it... We used to wash everything.' (LM, text)
giyuk-ga       
coverb (intr.)
 
to spit
Ngatjbarra giyuk-ga mi-ya-ngga! 'Go away to spit!' (LM)
 
see also dagelin, jubak-ga.
gobe-na       
infl. verb (ambitr.)
root -gobe-; past -na; also gobe-yan n.f. impfv, gobe-yh n.f. pfv
 
to lie
Wihya-ngala ga-ba-gobe-n-guju wuji ga-ba-rinyi-ra-ja-guju wir-gunda. Ba-bu-ji-na-guju-ma. 'No, they are lying. They didn't fall from the tree. They were fighting.'
Ngani-gobe-na-guju. 'You two lied to me.'
"Mu-berda-ja borroju! Gi-ya magu worrok-gay-gu lawel" gobe-jan. '"You lot cook for them! We're going over there to wash clothes" she used to lie.'
Ga-gobe-n ngonggo gahan, nugan wayi-tjjalbu. 'He lied to you, that little boy.' (LM)
Gobe-yh ngan-yaha-ny gahan lagiban. 'That man lied to me.' (LM)
 
see also no-gobey-gobey.
gobol       
nominal
 
grey hair
Ngal-martdiwa gahan gobol-garang. 'The old woman has grey hair.' (LL)
gogort       
nominal
 
fog
gokgo       
particle
   1.
still, yet
Pamngurlu wayiny gokgo. 'Pamngurlu was still a baby.' (LM, text)
Lollywater-binyju ba-ma-jan nendo-garang. Wuji ba-ma-jan, wahan nu-minyjan gokgo-wu gahan. 'They only used to get soft drink. There wasn't any beer yet (at that time).' (PH, text)
   2.
wait
Gokgo me-yobe mahan! 'Wait here!' (LM, text) note: Literally, this means 'stay here still'. So the 'wait' meaning is really only an extension of the 'still, yet' meaning.
golgol       
nominal
dialect LM
 
frog sp.
golp-ba       
coverb (tr.)
dialect PH, LL
 
to hook up a woomera
Golp-ba ga-ma-n-wu, manggarlin. 'He's hooking up a woomera.' (PH)
golpbon       
nominal
dialect HL, LL
 
ribs
Golpbon-leying ngan-dalh-ma-yi. 'He punched me in the ribs.' (LL)
 
see also ngumirtdal.
gomow       
nominal
   1.
string, rope
Gahan nganku gomow ngonong-nga-yiga debed-a ba-bu-ni, darrp-bay-gu lawel. 'They tied up a rope for hanging out clothes.' (LM, text)
Gomow bitjjirriny-nya ga-ba-bu-n, marun bitji-ba ga-bu-n, lagarra-wu-leying. 'They are rolling banyan to make string.' (LM, text)
   2.
necklace worn by widows
Gomow dirrk-ga ga-ba-ga-n ngangirdal-leying. 'They tie necklaces around their necks.' (PH)
   3.
jail
Ya-nginy now gomow-gu ba-ga-ndi. 'He went now, they took him to jail.' (HL, text)
gondo-yi       
infl. verb (tr.)
root -gondo-; past -yi; ppfv -ny
   1.
to have
Garradin gi-gondo-n? 'Do you have any money?' (LM)
Marluga! Lagiban larima ngi-gondo-yi-guju, Kaiser, Tommy Taylor. 'Men! We each had a boyfriend, Kaiser and Tommy Taylor.' (LM)
   2.
to keep
Mi-gondo-ja nganung may-giwu warren! 'Keep these two kids for me!' (LM)
gongork       
nominal
 
brains
Gongork wirriny-nya ga-ya. 'His brains go round and round (he is silly).' (PH)
gopborl       
nominal
variant gupburl (HL, PH, LL)
 
whip snake Demansia atra & olivacea
 
note: The bite is not deadly, however it can cause pain and severe swelling.
gordal       
nominal
variant gohrdal (HL)
 
head
Gay-gunda gordal wirriny-nya nga-ya-nggi. 'From that my head went round in circles.' (PH, text)
gordo-gin       
pronoun
variant ngordo-gin (HL, opt.)
2pl. genitive
 
belonging to you lot
Bohbo-yi ma-yi danganyin gordo-gin-guju warri-giwu? 'Did auntie get tucker for you two kids?' (LM)
gordok-ga       
coverb (intr.)
 
to have a headache
gordotj-ja       
coverb (intr.)
 
to nod
Gordotj-ja nga-yu. 'I'm nodding.' (HL)
 
see also duwatj-ja.
gori       
nominal
variant gore (HL, PH, LL)
 
charcoal
gorlododok       
nominal
   1.
peaceful dove Geopelia placida
   2.
bar-shouldered dove Geopelia humeralis
gorlondin       
nominal
 
thick forest, jungle, monsoon forest
Yerderdengh ga-ba-yu-guju magu gorlondin-ba. 'Those two are hiding in the jungle.' (LM)
 
see also malitjjin.
gornkorn-na       
coverb (intr.)
 
to talk
Gornkorn-na nga-ya-nggi Wagiman, wayi-gama. 'I spoke Wagiman when I was a kid.' (LM)
Gornkorn nga-ngaha-ny nung gahan jilimakgun, nga-ngotjje-ji-na. 'I wanted to talk with that woman, but I was too scared.' (PH)
 
see also ngili-ma, yurn-na.
gorokgorokgin       
nominal
 
bush apple Syzgium eucalyptoides ssp. bleeseri & eucalyptoides
 
note: The fruit of ssp. bleeseri can be eaten when they turn from pale pink to almost white. The fruit can get quite large and the flesh is sweeter than the other bush apples. The fruit of ssp. eucalyptoides are eaten when they turn red. The flesh is quite thin and the seed large, however the flesh has a pleasant, sharp taste. The fruit are often produced in large quantities.
goron       
nominal
stem goro-
 
house
Goron maman ngi-dipba-jan. 'We made a good house.' (LM, text)
Lahan ba-dipba-jan goron-ma nganku, wolon-yi. 'They used to make houses out of grass.' (LM)
Goro-leying ga-ba-yu guk-ga. Ga-ba-dipba-n goron wayi-tjjalbu. Lemh ga-ba-yu, wahan ga-rinyi-n. 'They're living in a humpy. They make a small house, and go inside when it rains.' (LM)
gorrh-ma       
coverb (intr.)
 
to go fishing
Larima ngal-martdiwa, gorrh-ma ba-yu-nginy-guju. 'The two old ladies were fishing.' (LM, text)
Gi-ya-ngana wilh-ma gorrh-ma-ga. 'We're walking to the river to go fishing.' (HL)
gorritj-ja       
coverb (intr.)
 
to be nice
Nga-guk-ga-yi-ma gorritj-ja. 'I was sleeping nicely.' (LM)
Gorritj-ja ga-ba-da-ma danganyin. 'They're eating nice tucker.' (LM)
 
see also no-gorritj-ja.
gorro       
particle
   1.
later
"Gorro jorro mu-di-guju woerrkgem namawu" ba-yama-jan ngerreju. '"You two come back later and do some more work," they used to say to us.' (LM, text)
   2.
tried but failed
Gorro nga-nga-nawu-ndi matjjin, but nga-ngotjja-yi. 'I tried to say something to her, but I was scared.' (HL)
Gorro ga-da-ny wahan wihya. Gahan wahan nganku-yiga-ma yu-nginy-ma, marnakgin-yiga-ma. 'She tried to drink the water, but no. That water was like what's it, like beeswax.' (LM, text)
gorrokgorrok       
nominal
dialect HL, PH
 
dollarbird Eurystomus orientalis
gort-da       
coverb (tr.)
 
to hit in back of the head or neck
Warren, labingan ba-bu-ni. Gort ba-bu-ng. 'They killed a child. They hit him in the back of the head.' (LM, text)
gotjjokgotjjok       
nominal
dialect HL, PH, LL
 
common bronzewing pigeon Phaps chalcoptera
gotjjonon       
nominal
dialect HL, PH, LL
 
wild banana Marsdenia viridiflora
gotnon       
nominal
 
magpie goose Anseranas semipalmata
Wirin ga-ga-n mada-k-madaru nganku gotnon-gu gu-bu-ja-min. 'He has a short throwing stick to kill geese with.' (LM)
 
note: The flesh is very tasty and magpie geese are highly sought after. The flesh is roasted in the coals of a fire after the feathers have been singed off and the guts removed. Often the meat is flavoured with paperbark leaves dipped in water, which moisten the meat and improve the flavour. Magpie geese can be hunted by swimming quietly underwater to where they are feeding and then staying underwater by breathing through a hollowed bamboo stem. As the geese duck their head under the water to feed, they can be grabbed by the neck and quickly strangled.
gubam       
nominal
   1.
hill
Menuny gubam-laying jumbany. 'Maybe it's behind that hill.' (PH)
Gubam-leying galh-ma mi-ya-ngana. 'We'll climb the hill.' (PH)
   2.
island
gubiji       
nominal
 
bone
Ba-da-yi watj, ba-da-ny gahan lamang. Gubiji-binyju yu-nginy. 'They ate up all the beef. Only the bones were left.' (LM, text)
gu-bing-ay       
nominal
dialect HL, PH, LL
 
firestick
Gu-bing-ay, bing-bing-nga ga-ga-n gu-bing-ay. 'A firestick is taken along glowing.' (PH)
gu-burnburnin       
nominal
 
dry
Mahan lawel gu-burnburnin ga-yu. 'These clothes are dry.' (HL)
guda       
nominal
   1.
fire
Guda ngi-dip-ba-yi-guju, ngi-berda-ng-guju danganyin borroju. 'We made a fire and cooked tucker for them.' (LM, text)
Guda gahan ngarr-ngarr da-nginy-ma. 'The fire caught alight.' (LM)
   2.
firewood
Marluga ngerrp-ba ga-du-n, guda. 'The old man is cutting firewood.' (LM)
   3.
gun
"Ma-du-yarra gahan marluga guda-yi!" yaha-ny. '"I will shoot that old man with a gun!" he said.' (LM, text)
   4.
light
Gahan bort me-ge nganku guda! 'Turn that light off!' (LM)
 
see also yorndon.
gu-dardatj-jan       
nominal
dialect HL, PH
 
strong
Gu-dardatj-jan ga-ya wilh-ma. 'He's walking strong.' (HL)
 
see also dardatj-ja.
gugarra       
nominal
 
red ochre
 
see also balarrin.
gugit       
nominal
 
narrow
Let-da ginggu-nanda-n, gugit-yi nibulin. 'He's looking at us with narrow eyes.' (HL)
gugiwu       
nominal
 
true
Gugiwu-yi ngan-nawu-ndi matjjin. 'He gave me the true story.' (HL)
Wihya gugiwu ngaa! 'No, I'm telling the truth!' (LM)
gujalin       
nominal
stem gujal-
 
sweet potato, also called bawutjin or badju Brachystelma glabriflorum
 
note: The small tuber can be dug up and eaten. It can be eaten raw or roasted and it is sweet and considered good eating. The small, dark, bell-like flowers point in the direction of other yams. The bean-like fruit can also be eaten without any preparation. In the past, large numbers of these yams could be collected, but there are less around these days.
gu-jilirr-man       
nominal
 
wet
Gu-jilirr-man lawel darrp mu-ge! 'You lot, hang up the wet clothes!' (LM)
 
see also jilirr-ma.
gujingga       
nominal
 
corroboree style involving clapping boomerangs
Werrinyin ga-bu-n, gujingga. 'He's singing a gujingga corroboree.' (PH)
gujirritj       
nominal
stem gujirr-
 
cold
Gahan lahan gujirritj-ma. 'That country is cold.' (LM, text)
Gujirritj-yi ngan-ma-n. 'I'm cold.' (HL)
 
see also gujirritj-ja.
gujirritj-ja       
coverb (intr.)
 
to be cold
Mahan bolwon ga-durdurt-da-n gujirritj-ja. 'A cold wind is blowing.' (LM)
 
see also gujirritj.
guk-ga       
coverb (intr.)
 
to sleep, to be asleep
Nga-rinyi-ng guk-ga. 'I fell asleep.' (HL)
Boran-leying nga-guk-ga-yi. 'I was sleeping by the river.' (PH)
Dorong-nga-wu ma-guk-ga. 'I will sleep sated.' (PH)
Larrweng-nga-wu ga-yu. Guk gaha-ny. 'His eyes are still open. He should have gone to sleep.' (PH)
Ga-yu guk-ga gahan labingan. 'The baby is asleep.' (LM)
Guk-ga nge-ge-na gahan warri-buga? 'Did you put the kids to sleep?' (LM)
 
see also worr-ma.
gulhgul-ma       
coverb (tr.)
dialect PH, LL
 
to gulp
Gulhgul-ma ga-da. 'He's gulping it down.' (PH)
gulin       
nominal
 
water yam Diascorea bulbifera
 
note: The large hairy yam can be dug up and eaten after it has been carefully and thoroughly prepared. The flesh is boiled, then sliced, then placed in running water for a few days. It is then ready to eat.
gulirritda       
nominal
variants gulilitda (HL), guliwitda (LL)
 
peewee, also called magpie lark Grallina cyanoleuca
Gayh-ma ga-ni ngonong-nga now. "Gulilit gulilit gulilit" ga-yu gayh-ma. 'It sings out like that now. "Gulilit gulilit gulilit" it sings out.' (HL)
 
note: This bird is considered a nuisance because it often alerts game to the presence of a hunter.
gulitj-ja       
coverb (tr.)
dialect HL
 
to stir
Gulitj-gulitj-ja ga-ma-n tea. 'He's stirring the tea.' (HL)
 
see also wilitjwilitj-ja.
gulp-ba       
coverb (intr.)
   1.
to fall down
Gulp nga-nga-rinyi-ng-ma. No-boritj-ja gahan lahan, wah-gunda. 'I nearly fell down. That ground is slippery because it's wet.' (LM)
Dowh le-na. Gulp linyi-ng ngal-martdiwa. 'He shot her. The old woman fell down.' (LM, text)
   2.
to be born
Gulp ngi-rinyi-ng gay-ba. 'You were born there.' (LM, text)
 
see also linyi-ra.
gumilan       
nominal
dialect LL
 
sand palm Livistona inermis
 
see also merrepben.
gumit       
nominal
   1.
skin
Wirrilh ngaha-ny, lagiyi nganing-gin gumit. 'My skin has gone red.' (LM)
   2.
skin (as in subsection)
Gahan gumit lihwa ga-ba-ya-guju. 'Those two are the wrong skins to be married.' (LM)
gumuny       
nominal
 
desert
gu-nawutj-jan       
nominal
   1.
heavy
Gu-nawutj-jan gahan garradin. 'That rock is heavy.' (PH)
   2.
heavy (of language)
Gu-nawutj-jan matjjin gahan, gornkorn-na ga-yu. 'He talks heavy language.' (LM)
 
see also nu-nawuja.
gunbarrin       
nominal
 
sand goanna Varanus gouldii
 
note: The flesh may be eaten after cooking. It is excellent food. They can be found while they are moving around looking for food, or tracked to their burrow and then dug up. Specially trained goanna dogs are also used to sniff out the burrows and tracks. Larger specimens may be speared, though sticks and rocks may also be used to kill them. All meat from the goanna is considered to be good food. Generally they are gutted, and cooked belly down on a bed of coals until the skin whitens, then turned belly up and cooked some more.
gungarak       
nominal
 
blue-tongue lizard Tiliqua scincoides
 
note: The flesh may be eaten after cooking on hot coals. Blue-tongues are caught by hitting them on the head with a stick or rock. They can give a nasty bite, and when they are angry they flatten their body onto the ground.
guningartngart       
nominal
dialect HL, PH, LL
 
grey-crowned babbler, also called happy family bird Pomatostomus temporalis
 
note: Often seen in large noisy groups.
gunubuya       
nominal
variant gunu (HL, PH)
 
stinking
Gunu ga-ya lamarra. 'The dog stinks.' (HL)
gunyjan       
nominal
stem gunyja-
   1.
ground
Laybul gu-ba-ya gunja-ba. 'The spirits will stay in the ground.' (LM, text)
   2.
dirt
Gunyjan ga-gondo-n nibulin-laying. 'He's got dirt in his eye.' (PH)
gunyukban       
nominal
   1.
black-headed python Aspidites melanocephalus
   2.
carpet python Morelia spilota
   3.
children's python Liasis childreni
 
note: This word is primarily used to refer to the black-headed python, although it can also be used to refer to the carpet snake. The carpet snake does not occur much in Wagiman territory, being found more towards the coast. The flesh can be eaten. It is cooked by coiling the snake into a hole with coals in it, then adding more coals on top. These snakes are normally only seen at night.
gurduk       
nominal
   1.
sacred, restricted
Gurduk-garang gahan lahan. Lagiban jamba ga-ba-ya gayh-ga. 'That place is a sacred site. Men aren't allowed to go there.' (HL)
   2.
dangerous
Guda jahan-gu bing-bing-nga gi-ma-n? Gurduk-ma gahan! 'Why are you waving that torch around? That is dangerous!' (LM)
guritjjin       
nominal
   1.
firestick tree
   2.
firestick
Birtbirt-da ga-yu guda ga-dipba-n, guritjjin-garang. 'He is rubbing firesticks, making a fire with firesticks.' (LM)
gurk-ga       
coverb (intr.)
dialect HL, PH, LL
   1.
to be lumpy
Mahan gurk-ga nga-yu eh lari. 'I've got a lump on my arm here.' (HL)
   2.
to be swollen
Gurk-ga ga-yu lagarra. 'His leg is swollen.' (HL)
 
see also nu-gurk-ga, bowh-ma.
gurnagun       
nominal
   1.
fat (as in having a lot of flesh)
Gay-giwu gurnagun ba-na-ni-guju. 'Those two have become fat.'
   2.
fat (as in actual body fat)
gurnangartngart       
nominal
dialect HL, PH, LL
 
white-breasted sea eagle Haliaeetus leucogaster
 
note: This eagle eats fish and turtles and is well known for its hunting skills.
 
see also bamdakgan.
gurndan       
nominal
dialect LL
 
bottle tree, also called boab Adansonia gregorii
 
note: There are some bottle trees planted around Pine Creek and Claravale. These have been grown from seeds brought from the Timber Creek area. The tree is not native to Wagiman country, which probably explains why speakers differ in what name they have for it.
 
see also guruwan.
gurnurtdu       
nominal
dialect PH, LL
 
dilly bag
gurnuwu       
nominal
 
knocked out
Duh nga-ra-ng nardal-yi-ma, gurnuwu nga-bu-ng. 'I punched him and knocked him out.' (LM)
gurrh-ma       
coverb (tr.)
 
to dig
Gunyjan gahan gurrh-gurrh nga-bu-ng. 'I dug up the ground.' (LM)
Jahan-gu gurrh-ma gu-ma-n gahan welin? 'Why are you lot digging that hole?' (PH)
Warragan-nyamu gurrh-ma-yan ngi-ma-jan-ngana. 'We also used to dig to get ground sugarbag.' (PH, text)
Gurrh-ma ba-jewo-ndi wahan, bony-bony-nyuy di-nginy. 'They dug following the water until it came bubbling up.' (LM)
Gurrh-gurr-ma nga-ya-nggi, witchetty. 'I went digging witchetty grubs.' (LM, text)
gurruwitj       
nominal
 
car
Mangima-yi yit-da bu-ni gahan gurruwitj. 'A policeman stopped the car.'
gururu-ma       
coverb (intr.)
 
to flow
Pipe dowk linyi-ng, wahan ga-di-n gururu-ma. 'The pipe cracked, and now the water is flowing out.' (LL)
Nibulin gururu-ma ga-ru-n-ma. 'She is crying.' (LM)
guruwan       
nominal
 
bottle tree, also called boab Adansonia gregorii
 
note: See comments under the entry for gurndan.
 
see also gurndan.
guwaluman       
nominal
 
long-nosed native bee Triota sp.
guwaylum       
nominal
dialect HL, PH
 
pigeon sp.
guwerek       
nominal
variant guwerak (HL, LL)
 
bush stone-curlew Burhinus grallarius
 
see also winduk.
guwirdal       
nominal
 
testicles
guyarru       
nominal
 
barn owl Tyto alba
guyet       
nominal
 
dry
Guyet na-ni garratjjin dil-may-gu. 'The spear grass has dried up ready for burning.' (LM)
guyim       
nominal
   1.
hurting
Ah guyim-garang nga-na-n nibulin! 'Ah, my eyes are starting to hurt!' (LM, text)
   2.
sore
Jalng-nga ga-yu guyim nganung-ma lari-ba. 'The sore on my arm is running.' (LM)
guy-ma       
coverb (intr.)
 
to be heaped up, piled up, stacked up
Danganyin nu-naw-ma, guy-ma ga-ni. 'There's a big pile of tucker.' (HL)
Guy-ma me-ge guda! 'Heap up the firewood!' (HL)

Copyright 1999-2001 AIATSIS, Stephen Wilson. Comments and enquiries to Stephen Wilson <stephenw@ucla.edu>.