Bb

badi-na       
infl. verb (tr.)
variant badi-ya (PH)
root -badi-; past -na ~ -ya (PH); ppfv -ng; also badi-yan n.f. impfv, badi-yh n.f. pfv
 
to bite
Jamba badi-yan gi-ya nung! 'Don't you go biting him!'
Duri-yi badi-yh ngan-yaha-ny lagarra. 'The snake bit me on the leg.'
Lamarra-yi munyju-badi! 'The dog is going to bite you!' (HL)
bahba       
nominal
 
brother
Gay-ba luwi-yan ngiyo-ngiyo-ngi-yobe-jan bahba-gu. 'We stayed there for ages and ages crying for our brother.' (LM, text)
 
see also nu-wapba-mang.
bakga       
nominal
 
tobacco
Yow, ma-ya-min bakga-gu mahan. Ge-bort-da-n-guju. 'Yes, I'll go right away for tobacco. We're dying for it.' (LM)
 
note: This is a based on the English word 'tobacco'.
bak-ga1       
coverb (intr.)
 
to break
Bak linyi-ng lari. 'He fell and broke his arm.' (LM)
Gahan gurruwitj bak-ga-yi-ma. 'That car broke down.' (LM)
Bak-ga nga-ma-yi guda. 'I broke up the firewood.' (HL)
Lari bak-bak ba-bu-ji-ng-guju gay-giwu, ngal-warlang-giwu. 'The married couple broke each other's arms.' (LM)
 
see also ma-bak-ga-yin.
bak-ga2       
coverb (tr.)
 
to name
Wujinyhma nga-bu-ndi bak-ga lawar. 'I named her Wujinyhma.' (HL, text)
balangurrk       
nominal
 
bad magic, voodoo, sorcery
Balangurrk ga-ba-ma-n, lagiban, ga-ya menuny, nungarin, gakgalak bort gaa. 'They do balangurrk on a man, and in about a month he dies.' (PH)
 
note: Balangurrk is hostile sorcery to kill or injure by grinding up clothes or other personal possessions. Clothes can be placed between two tree branches which grind together in the wind. It can take some time for the person to die, up to a few years.
balarrin       
nominal
stem bala-
 
white ochre
Wangga-gu, balarrin, ge-na nganung, burrhburr-ma nga-ya-nggi, wangga. 'They painted me with white ochre for a corroboree, and I danced.'
 
see also gugarra.
balbalin       
nominal
 
ground oven
Mabitjbaran belk-ga-yan ba-ya-ngga-jan gangaman, balbalin-ba. 'In the olden days, people used to roast kangaroos in a ground oven.' (LM)
 
see also derrin.
balkginy       
nominal
 
agile wallaby Macropus agilis
 
note: This small wallaby is very common and is often seen around rivers and billabongs.
balman       
nominal
 
grasshopper
Balman ga-ba-da nganku garratjjin. 'Grasshoppers eat what's it, grass.' (LM)
balp-ba       
coverb (tr.)
 
1. to step on
Danganyin nganing-gin balp-ba gi-nehe-n! 'You're treading on my tucker!' (HL)
 
2. to kick
Balp ngan-nehe-ng-ma gay-yi lagiban-yi. 'That man kicked me.' (LM)
 
3. to stomp
Bornhborn-na ga-ba-yu, balp-ba ga-ba-nehe-n wangga. 'They are dancing, they are stomping wangga.' (LM)
 
see also nehe-ndi.
bambarl       
nominal
 
bald
Gahan gordal, lardili-nehen ga-ya, bambarl ga-ya. 'He has no hair on his head, he is bald.' (LM)
bambelh-ma       
coverb (tr.)
dialect HL, PH
 
to stack
Bambelh-ma me-ge guda! 'Stack up the firewood!' (HL)
bambidi       
nominal
 
yellow-faced turtle Emydura spp.
Bambidi, gahan wayiny gordal buluman. 'Bambidi is a small turtle with a big head.' (LM)
 
note: These turtles are very common on Wagiman country. They occur in both river and billabong areas.
 
see also danybaraga.
bambur       
nominal
 
basket
bamdakgan       
nominal
dialect LM
 
white-breasted sea eagle Haliaeetus leucogaster
 
note: This eagle eats fish and turtles and is well known for its excellent hunting skills.
 
see also gurnangartngart.
bamh-ma       
coverb (ambitr.)
   1.
to put down, to leave
Berdeyh gubaa mama danganyin, bamh gu-ba-ge, fridge-leying. 'They will cook tucker and leave it in the fridge.' (LM)
   2.
to be heaped up, piled up, to heap up, pile up
Bamh-bam-ma ga-yu danganyin nu-naw-ma. 'There's a big pile of tucker.'
Magu bamh-bam-ma nga-bula-ndi. 'I left the tucker heaped up over there.' (LL)
banagan       
nominal
dialect LM
 
this side
Munybaban, lahan-nehen yu-nginy gahan. Banagan-binyju lahan yu-nginy, yobe-jan. 'There were no camps on the other side. Only on this side were there camps.'
 
see also mayh-baban.
bandahan       
nominal
 
cycad Cycas spp.
Bandahan birrk-birrk ba-bu-ng, dorroh ba-ma-ny danganyin ga-yu, munya. 'They smashed up the cycad nuts, and took out the food from inside.' (LM)
 
note: The seeds are collected and soaked in water for up to a week. They are then crushed up and made into dampers, which are wrapped in paperbark and roasted. The cooked damper is heavy and has a strong smell, however it tastes good, provides plenty of energy, and keeps for along time.
bang-nga       
coverb (tr.)
   1.
to spoil
Lahan bang-nga ba-bu-ni-ma, gerdo-gin gahan. 'They spoilt our country.' (LM)
   2.
to waste
Bang-nga gi-bu-n danganyin. 'You're wasting your tucker.' (HL)
   3.
to make a mess of
   4.
to damage
 
see also watjjorrng-nga.
baningh-nga       
interrogative coverb
variant banengh-nga (HL, PH, LL)
   1.
what?
Gornkorn-na mi-yu nung, munyju-nga-min! Bane-banengh-nga gi-yu, gornkorn-na? 'Speak up so that she can hear you! What are you saying?' (PH)
"Baningh-nga ngu-yama-yi?" yaha-ny. '"What have you lot been doing?" he asked.' (LM, text)
   2.
why?
"Ali baningh-nga durrp-durrp ngi-bu-ni-ma, wir-garang?" yaha-ny. '"Hey, why did you poke it with a stick?" he asked.' (LM, text)
Baningh-ngay-gu ga-ba-bu-n? 'Why are they killing them?' (LM, text)
   3.
how?
Banengh-nga bewh-ma mi-di-nya-buga? 'How are we going to come across?' (PH)
bapbu       
nominal
   1.
grindstone
Ngalma-ngal-martdiwa-yi ba-ma-ny bapbu, no-berlberlin garradin, birrk-gay-gu. 'The old ladies got grindstones, flat stones for crushing things with.' (LM)
   2.
Burdekin duck Tadorna radjah
note: The flesh of the Burdekin duck is very tasty.
Bapbu gahan no-dew-ma. 'The Burdekin duck is white.' (LM)
   3.
lizard sp.
 
note: These three meanings all have to do with roundness. The lizard called bapbu has a big round head like a grindstone.
barat-da       
coverb (intr.)
 
to pass by
Gurruwitj gahan barat-da ya-nggi ngerreju. 'That car passed us by.' (LM)
barawu       
nominal
 
shovel spear
Gangaman nge-re-jan nyamu barawu-garang. 'We used to spear kangaroos too with shovel spears.' (PH, text)
 
see also jangurl.
bardatj-ja       
coverb (intr.)
   1.
to be fussy or snobbish
   2.
to go along with your head down
Bardatj-bardatj ga-ya lewa-yan gi-ya-n-ma boy-ya. 'She is going around with her head down looking for something she has lost.' (LM)
bardigi       
nominal
 
nutwood tree Terminalia arostrata & grandiflora
 
note: The nutwood tree has several uses. The fruit can be cracked open and the seeds taken out and eaten. The fine black soot from the burnt bark can be mixed with oil and rubbed through the hair to darken it. And it can be used for firewood.
barhbar-ma-yi       
infl. verb (intr.)
dialect HL, PH, LL
root -barhbar-ma-; past -yi
 
to be tired
Nga-barhbar-ma-yi. Wuji mamak nga-ngaha-ny nung. 'I was tired. That's why I didn't say goodbye to her.'
 
see also nu-barhbar-ma-n, nyar-ma-yi.
bar-ma       
coverb (tr.)
 
to make a bed
Bar-ma me-ge lawel now! 'Put your swag down!' (HL)
barnangga       
nominal
 
nightjar Aegotheles cristatus & Caprimulgus spp.
 
note: This bird sits quietly during the day but is often seen flying at night.
barnanyin       
nominal
   1.
tree sugarbag, native bee
Barnanyin ga-ba-ma-n, den-na. Jimarn-leying maman gahan barnanyin ga-yu. 'They are cutting sugarbag. On the jimarnin tree is a good place for sugarbag.' (LM)
Nganku nyukgin-garang nga-ma-yi barnanyin, nyukgin. 'I got sugarbag with nyukgin grass.' (LM)
Datj-ja ga-bu-n wirin, gengelk gahan datj-ja ga-bu-n maman barnanyin, ga-gondo-n barnanyin. 'When the gengelk wattle tree is in bloom, it is good for sugarbag.' (LM)
   2.
honey
Barnanyin nap-ba ngan-le-n-ma, nap-nap ngan-ma-n lari. 'I've got honey stuck to my arm.' (LM)
barndimi       
nominal
 
women's dance style
Barndimi bornhborn-na ga-ba-ya, labali dordo-dordo-ma. 'They're dancing barndimi, shaking their legs.' (PH)
barndutjji       
nominal
 
olive python, also called rock snake Liasis olivaceus
Barndutjji-yarra, bornh-nay-gu ga-ya-wu, jabi ga-ya born-nay-gu. 'The olive python goes in the water. It knows how to swim.' (LM, text)
 
note: This python is very common on Wagiman country. It can grow very large. The flesh is eaten and is considered excellent food.
barnhbarn-na       
coverb (intr.)
 
to leave a track, make a track
Barnhbarn-na ya-nggi martdal mahan. 'Somebody has left footprints here.' (PH)
barp-ba       
coverb (intr.)
dialect HL, PH
 
to be behind
Jumbany barp-ba ga-ni wir-ba. 'He's hiding behind a tree.' (HL)
Mayh-giwu barp-ba ga-ba-ni-giwu mornen. 'These two are sitting back to back.' (HL)
barragarl       
nominal
 
bamboo sp. Sesbania cannabina
 
note: The dry straight stems are used to make spear shafts to hunt light game, such as ducks, bats and turkeys. These light spears can be thrown a very long way as they have the ability to glide in flight. Bigger plants have wood like cork at their base.
barrakbarrak       
nominal
   1.
diver duck, also called cormorant Phalacrocorax spp.
note: These birds eat prawns, mussels and fish. They often dive underwater.
   2.
witch doctor, clever fellow
note: Witch doctors can be called barrakbarark because they wear the feather of this bird.
Warnanggal-yi, yowtj ge-ng gahan lagiban barrakbarrak. Bunggu-bu-jan-min lagiban, lihwa-tjjondony gahan. Bort-da-yan bunggu-bu-jan, nu-naw-ma lagiban. 'Witch doctors used to find people, and kill them. No good that. They used to kill lots of people.' (PH)
Barrakbarrak ga-ga-n gordal-ba. 'He wears a diver duck feather on his head.' (HL)
 
see also warnanggal.
barrbarrin       
nominal
dialect HL, PH, LL
 
long garfish
 
see also jagambarrin.
barri       
interrogative nominal
 
where?
Barri-ba ba-ya-nggi-guju warri-giwu? 'Where did those two kids go?' (LM, text)
Barri-ya-gunda ma-yi gahan lawel? 'Where did she get that dress from?' (LM)
barri-bibin       
interrogative nominal
 
how many?
Barri-bibin ngi-ma-yi garnamalin? 'How many cheeky yams did you get?'
barri-miya       
interrogative nominal
 
who?
Barri-miya gahan warri-giwu? 'Who are these two kids?' (LM, text)
barrnghbarrng-nga       
coverb (intr.)
 
to glow (of the rainbow)
Barrnghbarrng-nga ga-yu jagort. 'The rainbow glows.' (LM)
batjjal       
nominal
 
sugarcane grass Heteropogon triticeus
 
note: The stems contain sweet juice. They are collected and eaten in the wet season when they are sweetest. Children are especially fond of this sweet juice.
bawort-da       
coverb (intr.)
 
to look over
Bawort-da ga-yu wayi-tjjalbu. 'The kid is looking over (the fence).' (PH)
Gamayang galh-ma nga-ya-nggi gahan bawort-da nga-yu-nginy munybaban, nga-nanda-yi Jibortbortla. 'I climbed up Gamayang and looked down over the other side. I saw Jibortbortla.' (LM)
 
see also dawh-ma.
belelh-ma       
coverb (intr.)
dialect LM
 
to rattle
Garradin belelh-ma ga-yu. 'The money is rattling.' (LM)
 
see also jelelh-ma, nyelelh-ma.
belerr-ma       
coverb (tr.)
dialect HL, PH
 
to clap boomerangs or any sticks together
Bele-belerr-ma, ga-gondo-n, buran. 'He is clapping boomerangs.' (PH)
belh-ma       
coverb (tr.)
dialect HL
 
to paint
Warren gahan belh-ma ga-ba-ge-n nung, gunyjan. 'They're painting the kid with mud.' (HL)
belkga-yi       
infl. verb (tr.)
root -belkga-; past -yi; also belkga-yan n.f. impfv, belkga-yh n.f. pfv
 
to roast
Mabitjbaran belkga-yan ba-ya-ngga-jan gangaman, balbalin-ba. 'In the old days they used to roast kangaroos in a ground oven.' (LM, text)
Yunumburrgu le-na. Belkga-yh ngi-yama-ny. 'He shot a male kangaroo. We roasted it.' (LM, text)
 
note: This word is usually found in one of its two non-finite derived forms.
belkgin       
nominal
dialect HL, PH
 
wet mud
Belkgin-leying jarratj linyi-ng. 'He slipped over in the wet mud.' (PH)
belpberin       
nominal
   1.
clean country, clearing
Magu ga-ba-guk-ga-n belpberin ga-yu. 'They are camping over there where it is clear.' (LM)
   2.
ring place
Mululuk ba-yu-nginy belpberin. 'The initiates were in the ring place.' (LM)
benbe       
nominal
 
tick
bengbenggin       
nominal
variant benybenyin (PH)
 
water python Bothrochilus fuscus
bengh-nga       
coverb (tr.)
 
to poke
Nibulin bengh nga-ma-ji-ng. 'I poked myself in the eye.' (LM)
 
see also durrp-ba.
benyhbeny       
particle
 
a little while
Nga-ya wambaru benyhbeny nga-ya ma-di jorro-ma gawor. 'I'm just going for a little while. I'll come back this afternoon.' (LM)
berda-yi       
infl. verb (tr.)
root -berda-; past -yi; past pfv -ng; also berde-yen n.f. impfv, berde-yh n.f. pfv
   1.
to cook
Berde-yen ngi-yobe-jan-gujuuu... guy. 'We used to keep cooking until we had a big pile.'
Guda ngi-dipba-yi-guju, ngi-berda-ng-guju danganyin borroju. 'Us two made a fire, and we cooked tucker for them.' (LM, text)
Berde-yh ba-yama-ny nung gay-gu marluga-gu. 'They cooked it for the old men.' (LM, text)
   2.
to burn
Me-berda-ji guda gahan mi-bula! 'You're going to burn yourself! Leave that fire alone!'
bererin1       
nominal
variant berin (HL, PH)
 
march fly
Gahan bererin-yi ngan-badi-na. 'That march fly bit me.' (LM)
bererin2       
nominal
 
emu apple tree Owenia vernicosa
beretjjin       
nominal
 
spoonbill Platalea flavipes & regia
 
note: The flesh can be cooked and eaten.
 
see also nangalan.
berlin       
nominal
stem berli-
 
shoulder
bernak       
nominal
variant bernarlin (PH, CM)
 
white cedar tree Canarium australianum
 
note: The stems of large straight trees can be used to make dugout canoes and woomera shafts. The wood is light and easy to carve; it is also very buoyant and floats well. The seeds can be eaten; the fruit are broken open and the seeds taken out. The fruit are often eaten by birds.
berreny       
nominal
 
better
"Mu-ga-ja jorro-ma, lihwa-tjjondony. Yowtj me-ge maman berreny, woerrke-may-gu" yaha-ny nung. '"You lot take them back, they are no good. Find some better workers," he said to her.' (LM)
Denh nga-ma-ji-ng nardal-ma. Ngigun berreny denh-na mi-bu, lurrutj. 'I've cut my hand. You're the better one to cut it, because you're strong.' (LM)
berrh-ma       
coverb (tr.)
   1.
to throw
Gahan guwirdal berrh-berr-ma ga-ba-ra-ji-n-guju warri-giwu gahan. 'The two kids are throwing a football to one another.' (LM)
Berrh-ma mi-ra nganung! 'Throw it to me!' (HL)
Berrh many-la! 'I'll throw it to you!' (HL)
"Gahan murrkgun berrh many-ba-ra wah-leying" yaha-ny. '"I will throw you three in the water" he said.' (LM, text)
   2.
to throw away, discard
Dorh-ma ngu-ma-yi gahan nganku, berrh-may-gu gahan, gahan giyak-giyak ga-ba-yu-ma? 'Have you lot picked up the rubbish to throw it away?' (LM)
Garradin dortdorl-ba ga-ga-n-ma ga-ra-n berrh-ma menuny! 'He's always dropping money, maybe he throws it away!' (LM)
   3.
to spit
Dagelin berrh nga-ra-ng gunyjan-leying. 'I spat on the ground.' (PH)
bert-da       
coverb (tr.)
dialect PH, LL
 
to blame
Bert-da gi-ra-n ngani warren nganing-gin. 'You're blaming it on my kid.' (LL)
bertdek-ga       
coverb (tr.)
   1.
to slap
Bertdek nga-bu-ng nardal-yi. 'I slapped him with my hand.' (LM)
Lagiban jokgorn-garang nu-naw-ma-nyamu born-born-na. Martdal-garang bertdek-ga ba-bu-ni gunyjan. 'Lots of men wearing cockrags were dancing. They were stomping on the ground with the feet.' (PH)
   2.
to flog
Nendo betdek-ga ba-bu-ni. 'They flogged the horse.' (PH)
bet-da       
coverb (tr.)
 
to hit in the chest
Bet-da ngan-bu-ni warreh-yi. 'The kid punched me in the chest.' (HL)
bewh-ma       
coverb (tr.)
 
to cross
Boran bewh-ma nga-bu-n. 'I'm crossing the river.' (HL)
Bewh-ma ba-ya-nggi liri-ma. 'They swam across.' (LM)
beworn       
nominal
 
short-eared rock wallaby, also called pademelon wallaby Petrogale brachyotis
 
note: This wallaby lives in caves and crevices in rocky country and is often seen in gorges.
bey-ma       
coverb (intr.)
 
to dry up
Wahan bey-h yaha-ny gahan Guwardagun. 'The water dried up in the Daly River.' (LM)
Ngurru-yi ga-ma-n bey-ma. 'The sun is drying it up.' (HL)
bijip-ba       
coverb (ambitr.)
variant wijip-ba (HL)
   1.
to be rolled up; to roll up
Lahan nganing-gin bijip-ba-wu ga-yu. 'My swag is rolled up.' (LM)
Nganing-gin swag, wijip-ba ba-bu-ni. 'Someone rolled up my swag for me.' (HL)
Bijip-ba-gunda maman. 'It is rolled up ready.' (PH)
Bijip-ba gahan lahan ngi-bu-ni nginyang? 'Have you rolled up our swag?' (LL)
   2.
to twist
Mangurdal nganing-gin bijip-ba nga-bu-ji-na. 'I twisted my neck.' (LM)
bik-ga       
coverb (tr.)
 
to sweep
Bik nga-bu-ng gahan ngagun ma-yu dup-ba. 'I have swept up there where I want to sit.' (LM)
Ngagun bik-ga nga-ya-nggi lahan yimbama. 'Me, I went round sweeping the place all day.' (LM)
bikgin       
nominal
variant bikgi (PH)
stem bikgi-
 
lizard sp. Varanus primordius
bilh-ma       
coverb (tr.)
   1.
to blow (of the wind)
Gordal-gunda, bolwo-yi bilh bu-ng. 'The wind blew my hat off my head.' (PH)
   2.
to fan
Burbur-garang bilh-bilh mi-bu gahan guda! 'Fan the fire with a goose wing!' (LM)
   3.
to shake
Bilh-bil-ma nga-bu-n, lahan nganing-gin. 'I'm shaking out my swag.' (PH)
Bilbil-ma ga-ma-ji-n lamarra. 'The dog is shaking itself.' (LM)
   4.
to fly
Yawey burbur-garang gahan bilh-bil-ma ga-ya yimbama. 'Yes, those planes are always flying.' (LM)
 
note: Usually reduplicated bilh-bil-ma.
 
see also dordo-ma, warhwar-ma.
biliwilip       
nominal
dialect PH, LL
 
wrestling
Biliwilip ga-ba-ma-ji-n-giwu. 'Those two are wrestling.' (PH)
 
note: This word seems more properly to belong to another language, but some speakers use it.
bil-ma       
coverb (intr.)
dialect HL, LL
 
to float
Marak gahan bil-ma ga-ya, wah-leying. 'The leaves are floating on the water.' (LL)
binbabajarri       
nominal
variants binbajarri, binbirritjjin (HL), babatjjarri (PH)
 
forest kingfisher Halcyon macleayii
binbin1       
nominal
 
armlets
Binbin, lem ge-ng lari-leying. 'She put armlets on her arm.' (PH)
 
see also yerrel.
binbin2       
nominal
dialect HL, PH
 
crimson finch Neochmia phaeton
bindal       
nominal
 
stomach
Bindal-garang ya-nggi, ngal-warlang nung-gin. 'His wife was pregnant.' (LM)
Bindal biritj-ja nga-yu, lihwa ba-boro-ndi, lahan nganing-gin. 'My stomach is stirring (in anger), because they have made my country no good.' (PH)
Dorong ngaha-ny, bindal. 'My belly is full.' (LM)
Bindal-yi ngany-ma-n! 'I love you binji proper!' (HL) note: Aboriginal people consider the stomach to be the location of many emotions, just like English people think of the heart.
bindirin1       
nominal
variant bindiri (LM, HL)
 
fork (in tree, river, etc.)
Bindirin ga-yu gahan-ma jaley-may-gu borndedi. 'The fork there is for hanging up billycans.' (LM)
bindirin2       
nominal
dialect HL, PH
 
grass which has been burnt some time ago
 
see also wibin.
bingh-nga       
coverb (tr.)
 
to pinch
Ga-ba-bingh-nga-n-giwu. 'Those two are pinching each other.' (PH)
bing-nga       
coverb (intr.)
   1.
to glow
Bing-nga ga-ya. 'It's going along glowing (the tail-lights of a car).' (HL)
   2.
to be shiny
Bing-nga, bing-bing-nga ga-yu nganku, jahan gahan, garnamalin nu-minyjan. 'What is shiny? The sap of the poisonous cheeky yam.' (LM)
 
note: This word can be used to describe things like the embers of a fire, a dying torch, or the glow of a cigarette at night.
binkan       
nominal
 
black bream Hephaestus fuliginosus
Lamang binkan bulu-bulman ngi-ma-jan. 'We used to get very big black bream.' (LM, text)
binybiny-nya       
coverb (intr.)
dialect PH, HL, LL
 
to make a sucking kissing sound with your lips
Binybiny-nya ga-yu damorom. 'He's making a sucking kissing sound with his lips.' (PH)
binygorlk-ga       
coverb (tr.)
variants benygork-ga (HL), binygurlk-ga (PH)
 
to drink quickly, to gulp down
Binygorlk-ga ga-da gahan nu-minyjan wahan. 'He's gulping down beer.' (LM)
binyju       
suffix
 
only
Ba-da-yi watj, ba-da-ny gahan lamang. Gubiji-binyju yu-nginy. 'They ate up all the beef. Only the bones were left.' (LM, text)
bip-ba       
coverb (tr.)
variant biip-ba (PH)
 
to carry
Bip-ba ga-ga-n mornen-ba, nendo-nendo. 'He's carrying him on his back, like a horse.' (LM)
birdugurt-da       
coverb (intr.)
variant birndugurt-da (PH)
 
to hunt with spears
Garnin, birdugurt-da ga-ya lamang-gu. 'He's going hunting with a spear for game.' (LM)
birh-ma       
coverb (ambitr.)
   1.
to dance slapping thighs
Birh-bir-ma ga-ya warratj-jay-gu. 'She is dancing slapping her thighs.' (LM)
   2.
to kick
Nungarin lagiban, nendo-yi, birh ma-yi. 'The horse kicked a man.' (LM)
birndalijan       
nominal
 
wild grape Ampelocissus acetosa & frutescens
 
note: The fruit can be eaten when they turn black. The tuber is often eaten by pigs, but not by people.
birndi       
nominal
 
native mouse Planigale maculata
birridip-ba       
coverb (intr.)
variants burrudup-ba (HL, LL), borrodop-ba (PH)
 
to gallop
Borrodop mama ngi-ya-ngga-jan garradin-leying longh-nga-yan bulikgi-wu. 'We used to gallop over rocky ground mustering cattle.' (PH, text)
birriman       
nominal
dialect PH
 
big
Garradin birriman galh ngi-yama-ny-ngana. 'We climbed a big hill.' (PH)
 
see also buluman.
birritj-ja       
coverb (ambitr.)
dialect HL, PH, LL
   1.
to roll up
Maman ngigun, birritj-ja gi-bu-n-min. 'You're good at rolling smokes.' (PH)
   2.
to stir
Bindal birritj-ja nga-yu. Lihwa ba-boro-ndi, lahan nganing-gin. 'My stomach is stirring (in anger). They have made my country no good.' (PH)
Bolwon-yi birritj-ja ga-bu-n wahan. 'The wind is stirring up the water.' (PH)
birrk-ga       
coverb (tr.)
 
to smash, pound or crush
Nardal birrk-ga ba-bu-ng. 'They smashed his hand.' (LM, text)
Wangardin, maman ga-yu gahan. Birrk ga-ba-du-n, nganku marnakgin-yiga ga-ya gahan danganyin. 'The wangardin yam is good. They smash it open, and inside there is tucker like beeswax.' (LM)
birtbirt-da       
coverb (intr.)
variant bertbert-da (HL)
   1.
to rub firesticks
Birtbirt-da ga-yu guda ga-dipba-n, guritjjin-garang. 'He is making a fire by rubbing firesticks.' (LM)
   2.
to rub yourself
Birtbirt-da ga-yu lamarra gahan. 'That dog is rubbing itself.' (LM)
   3.
to shake yourself
Birtbirt-da ga-ma-ji-n laberri. 'It (the dog) is shaking out its hair.' (LM)
birt-da       
coverb (tr.)
 
to kick
Nendo birt ngan-bu-ng. 'The horse kicked me.' (LM)
bitjjirriny-nya       
coverb (tr.)
dialect LM
   1.
to roll up
Bitjjirriny-nya mi-bu dardatj-ja gahan lahan-ma, ngerra-ngana, durrin-yi lem gi-ra-gardu! 'Roll our swag up tight, or a snake might go inside it!' (LM)
   2.
to twist
Jorrng-nga nga-ma-ny bitjjirriny-nya nga-ma-ny. 'I wrung (the clothes) out, I twisted them.' (LM)
 
see also nu-bitjji-ma.
biyakgin       
nominal
 
sister
Bicycle gahan ngi-ga-ndi-guju biyakgin-giwu warh ngi-ma-ny-guju. 'My sister and I took those bicycles and rode them.' (LM, text)
 
see also mayiwa, ngal-biyak-mang.
bogo       
pronoun
3pl. base
 
them, they
Bogo start ba-yama-ny. Yonggorn-na-ma, bunggu-re-na garn-yi. 'It was them who started it. They speared them first.' (LM, text)
 
note: This word is rare; it is much more common to use gay-gorden or may-gorden instead.
bohbo       
nominal
 
aunt
Mamak ngi-yama-ny-guju nung bohbo-gu. 'Us two said goodbye to auntie.' (LM)
bok-ga       
coverb (tr.)
 
to dip, to scoop
Bok-ga mi-ma nganung wahan! 'Scoop up some water for me!' (HL)
bolomin       
nominal
variant bolohmin (HL)
 
white gum Eucalyptus papuana
Ngi-ma-yi bolohmin? Maman yortdin-gu. 'Did you get white gum? It is good for ashes.' (HL)
 
note: The white outer bark is burnt to a fine ash and mixed with chewing tobacco to improve the flavour. The wood makes excellent firewood.
bolondo       
nominal
 
fork-tailed kite Milvus migrans
bolwo-gin       
nominal
 
cold windy weather
Bolwo-gin-wu, nendo muster-im ngi-yama-jan-wu. 'In the cold windy time, we used to muster the horses.' (PH, text)
bolwon       
nominal
stem bolwo-
 
wind
Bolwon-yi birritj-ja ga-bu-n wahan. 'The wind is stirring up the water.' (PH)
 
see also wangalanggu.
bonggo       
nominal
variant bornko (PH)
 
small water goanna sp.
bongorrk-ga       
coverb (intr.)
 
to snore
Bongorrk-ga ga-yu marluga gahan yimbama. 'That old man is always snoring.' (LM)
bonybony-nya       
coverb (intr.)
variant binybiny-nya (PH)
 
to spring from the ground (of water)
Dil ngi-ra-ng, dabali-ma, bonybony ga-yu gahan Gypsy Creek, wahan-garang. 'We burnt all around where Gypsy Creek springs from.' (LM, text)
bonyh-nya       
coverb (tr.)
 
to suck
Lenyi-yi bonyh-nya ngan-bu-n labulbul. 'A leech is sucking my blood.' (LM)
 
see also dorrngh-nga, jonghjong-nga.
bonyilin       
nominal
dialect HL, LL
 
big black butterfly
bonyorrk       
nominal
 
boggy
Mahan lahan bonyorrk ga-yu. 'This country is boggy.' (LL)
boran       
nominal
variant bohran (HL)
stem bora- ~ borah- (HL)
 
river
Lek-ga-wa ngi-ya-ngga-jan boran-leying. 'We used to go down to the river.' (PH, text)
bordo-gin       
pronoun
3pl. genitive
 
their, theirs
Ga-ba-ya jorro-ma, lahan bordo-gin-leying dup-bay-ga. 'They are going back to their country to stay.' (LM)
bordok       
nominal
   1.
tata dragon Diporiphora spp.
note: The tata dragon is too small to eat.
Lamang bordok gahan mamak-mamak ga-yu. 'The tata dragon waves goodbye.' (LL)
   2.
chameleon Chelosania brunnea
note: The chameleon can change the colour of its skin depending on where it is.
bore-na       
infl. verb (ambitr.)
variants bohrre-na (HL, LL), borreh-ma (PH)
root -bore-; past -na; also bore-yh ~ bohrre-yh (HL) n.f. pfv
   1.
to dream
Boreyh-bore-yh ga-ya guk-ga-ma. 'He's dreaming.' (LM)
Bore-yh ga-ma-ji-n-ma. 'He's dreaming.' (LM)
   2.
to dream about
Nga-bore-na gahan ngal-martdiwa magu-gunda gitjjiya nge-ge-na magu-ma. 'I dreamt about that old lady from over there who we have just buried.' (LM)
Gahan bore-yh ga-ma-n lihwa-ma. Mamin boreyh-bore-yh ga-ma-n. Werrh ga-di-n nung. 'He's having a bad dream. He's dreaming about ghosts. They come out to him.' (LM)
   3.
to be a dreaming
Bore-yh gahan lamang, yakba. "Nga-di-n lah-ga-ma" yaha-ny. 'That animal was a dreaming, the freshwater crocodile. "I'm coming to camp" it said.' (LM, text)
Gangaman gahan-ma nganku, ga-yu bore-yh gahan. 'That kangaroo is a dreaming.' (LM)
 
note: The form bore-yh is by far the most commonly used.
borhborin       
nominal
dialect HL, PH, LL
 
tree sp. Xanthostemon paradoxus
 
note: The hard, dense wood can be used to make boomerangs and nulla-nullas.
borndan       
nominal
stem bornda-
 
pandanus Pandanus aquaticus & spiralis
Gahan dajup ba-ge-ng majalin weyehweye. Bornda-garang ba-bu-ni-ma, dorroh-dorroh ba-ga-ng borndan. Gahan-di ba-ma-yi majalin. 'They trapped the small fish. They got them with pandanus, by dragging it through the water. That's how they caught the fish.' (LM)
 
note: Didgeridoos can be made from the hollow stems, and the fibre is used to make baskets. The seed from inside the larger fruit of spring pandanus (Pandanus spiralis) can be eaten.
borndedi1       
nominal
 
knee
Japbany mi-ya nganung, borndedi mahan lihwa nga-ya! 'Go slow for me, because my knees are no good!' (LM)
borndedi2       
nominal
variant borndehdi (HL)
   1.
billycan
Ngal-martdiwa-yi labu-ndi wahan, bok ma-ny borndedi-garang. 'The old woman went for water, she scooped it up in a billycan.' (PH)
   2.
any tin, bottle or can
bornhborn-na       
coverb (intr.)
 
to dance (of men)
Werrenyin-wu ba-bu-jan marlarluga-yi, bornhborn-na-wu. 'The old men used to make a corroboree, dancing.' (PH, text)
bornh-na       
coverb (intr.)
   1.
to bogey, bathe, swim about
Gokgo wert mee nganung bornh ma-du dorroh ma-di, ngigun mi-ya bornh-na. 'Wait, turn around from me! I'll bathe, then I'll come out, and you can have a bogey.' (LM)
Bornh-bornh ngi-yu-nginy gay-ba. 'We went for a bogey there.' (LM, text)
   2.
to be in water
Gahan, magu ga-yu. Garradin gijalkgin ngonong-nga wah-leying bornh-bornh ga-yu. Warren, ga-yu gahan. Lahan warren-gu, labingan-ma. 'It is over there. A limestone rock, it lies in the water like that. It's a child. This country is a child's dreaming.' (LM, text)
Bornh ga-ba-ge-n wah-ba, ga-ba-bula-n gakgalak. 'They put it in the water, and leave it for a month.' (HL, text)
 
see also liri-ma.
bornorron       
nominal
 
brolga Grus rubicundus
Bornorron, ma-yi majalin wayi-tjjalbu, menuny durtdu. Ga-ga-n damorom-leying jaley-ma. 'The brolga caught a small fish, maybe a perch. It takes it away, hanging from its beak.' (PH)
 
note: The brolga is well known for its dancing during courtship. It features prominently in dreamtime stories and was an excellent didgeridoo player. This bird is not normally hunted, but the meat can be eaten.
boro-ndi       
infl. verb (tr.)
root -boro-; past -ndi; ppfv -ng
   1.
to make, to cause
Guk ngi-boro-ng warri-buga? 'Did you put the kids to sleep?' (LM)
Lihwa-tjjondony-yi danganyin, nyongh-nga gunyju-boro-n. 'Bad tucker makes you sick.' (HL)
Warreh-buga-yi, liwha ga-boro-n garden. Mi-ba-bu, nimbutj-ja! 'The kids are messing up the garden. Chase them away!' (HL)
Nendo gay-gu menyin boro-ng-ma. 'He made trouble over the horse.' (LM, text)
   2.
to make, as in create
Gin-boro-n-ngana tape. 'We are making a tape.' (LM)
borotj-ja       
coverb (intr.)
variant britj-ja (HL, LL)
 
to slip
Britj-ja nga-nehe-ndi. 'I slipped over.' (HL)
 
see also no-boritj-ja, jorrotj-ja.
borroju       
pronoun
3pl. dative/oblique
 
to them
"Ngi-ma-n-guju-ma garradin!" ngi-yama-ny borroju. '"We get paid money!" we said to them.' (LM, text)
Yimbama ngi-ya-ngga-jan wilh-ma borroju. 'All the time we used to walk around with them.' (LM, text)
borrongh-nga       
coverb (intr.)
 
to swagger
Borrongh-borrong-nga ga-ya wilh-ma. 'He swaggers about.' (PH)
 
see also no-borrongh-nga, letjletj-ja.
bort-da       
coverb (intr.)
   1.
to die
Bort ba-bu-ng. 'They killed him.' (LM)
Danganyin-gu ga-ba-bort-da-n, warri-buga. 'The kids are dying for tucker.' (LM)
Nganing-gin marluga johjo bort yaha-ny ngani. 'My old husband died on me.' (HL)
   2.
to extinguish
Guda gahan bort nge-ge-ng? 'Did you put that fire out?' (LM)
   3.
to be lazy
Ga-bort-da-n gahan jilimakgun wuji ga-ya-nggi bik-ga lahan. 'That woman is lazy, she hasn't swept up the camp.' (HL)
bortden       
particle
 
in turn
Bortden ngany-nawu-ndi ngigun bortden mani-nawu-ja! 'I gave to you before so now it's your turn to give to me!' (LM)
Ngigun now bortden bik-ga mi-ya-ngga-ja nginyang lahan! 'It's your turn to sweep up our camp!' (LM)
bowh-ma       
coverb (intr.)
   1.
to swell
Bowh ngaha-ny martdal nganing-gin. 'My foot swelled up.' (PH)
   2.
to be lumpy
Gunyjan bowh-bow-ma ga-yu. 'The ground is lumpy.' (HL)
 
see also gurk-ga.
bowk-ga       
coverb (intr.)
 
to howl
Lamarra ga-yu bowk-ga. 'The dog is howling.' (HL)
bowp-ba       
coverb (intr.)
   1.
to be warm, to warm up
Lahan ma-guk-ga-min bowp-ba. 'I will sleep warm.' (LM)
Guda-leying bowp nga-ge-ng-ma. 'I warmed it up on the fire.' (LM)
   2.
to be the wet season
Bowp-ba-wu gu-rinyi menuny wahan. 'In the wet season it will rain.' (LM)
boyh-ma       
coverb (intr.)
 
to go away
Boyh mahanan jowk-ga ba-ra-ndi. 'They sent them away this way.' (LM, text)
boyhya-       
infl. verb (tr.)
root -boyhya-; tenses unclear; also boyh n.f. pfv
   1.
to forget
Nga-boyh-ya marluga lawar. 'I forgot the old man's name.' (HL)
Woyoworin boyh ngehe-ny. Ge-rega-ng nginyang. 'You forgot the fishing line. You should have brought it for us.' (LM)
   2.
to lose
Warren nga-boyhya-ma. Ngan-bula-ndi-ma. 'I have lost my child. He has left me (died).' (LM, text)
Hat nganing-gin boyh ngaha-ny-ma. Linyi-ra ngani, dolp-buy. 'I lost my hat. It fell off.' (LM)
boy-ma       
coverb (tr.)
 
to rub
Ngal-martdiwa-yi, boy-boy-ma ngan-ma-yi nibulin. Maman nga-ya let-da now. 'The old lady rubbed my eye for me. Now I can see well.' (LM)
bugali       
nominal
 
cousin
Gahan lalang bugali nganing-gin. 'That girl is my cousin.' (PH)
 
note: The proper Wagiman word for 'cousin' is yerrongan, but nowadays bugali is commonly used too.
 
see also yerrongan.
buga-ndi       
infl. verb (tr.)
variant buga-yi
root -buga-; past -ndi ~ -yi; also buga-yan n.f. impfv, buga-yh n.f. pfv
   1.
to give birth to, to bear
Gayh-yi, jilimakgun-yi, ga-buga-n warren. 'The woman is having a baby.' (HL)
   2.
to lay
Jorihjoritj-yi buga-yi gahan jarruk. 'A bowerbird laid that egg.' (HL)
   3.
to name
Ngagun-yi nga-buga-ndi lawar. 'It was me who named him.' (LM)
   4.
to call someone's name
Jamba buga-yan mi-yu lawar nung-gin gahan marluga bort-da-yi! 'Don't call out that old man's name! He has died.' (LM)
Yimbama buga-yan ga-ya mamin. 'He's always calling out the names of people who have died.' (LM)
   5.
to sing
Wangga watj ba-buga-ndi-ma. 'They have finished singing the corroboree.' (LM)
 
see also yunbu-yan.
bukbuk       
nominal
 
pheasant coucal Centropus phasaianinus
bula       
nominal
 
teenage boy
Bula gahan, wuji ga-rinyi-ja mululuk, gokgo-wu. 'A bula has not yet been initiated.' (LM)
bula-ndi       
infl. verb (tr.)
root -bula-; past -ndi; ppfv -ng
 
to leave
Jilimakgun nung-gin-yi durdurt bula-ndi. 'His woman ran away and left him.' (HL, text)
Mi-bula gahan danganyin denh-na-wehen! 'Leave that tucker! No more cutting it!' (LM, text)
Jaley-wuy ge-ge-n wanh gi-bula-n. 'We hang it up and leave it.' (LM, text)
Magu bamh-bam-ma nga-bula-ndi. 'I left it in a heap over there.' (LL)
Warren nga-boyhya-ma. Ngan-bula-ndi-ma. 'I have lost my son. He has left me (passed away).' (LM, text)
 
see also wanh-na.
bulbulp-ba       
coverb (intr.)
variant bulpbulp-ba (HL, PH)
 
to be hairy
 
see also nu-bulpbulp-ba.
bulitj       
coverb (intr.)
dialect LM
 
to be married straight
Bulitj-ja ga-ba-guk-ga-n-guju, ngal-warlang nung-gin. 'Those two are married straight.' (LM)
bulkgu       
nominal
   1.
middle, centre
Yakba ga-yu gayh-laying, langgarn-leying, bulkgu. 'There is a crocodile in the middle of the billabong.' (LL)
Bulkgu linyi-ra gahan wayi-tjjalbu. 'That kid was born in the middle (neither first nor last).' (PH)
   2.
halfway
Ngi-ya-nggi Katherine-ga, bak ngi-yama-ny motorcar bulkgu. 'We wanted to go to Katherine, but the car broke down halfway.' (PH)
 
see also jany-bulkgu, lardi-bulk.
bulmu       
nominal
variant bulmun (LL)
 
white currant Flueggea virosa
 
note: The fruit can be eaten when they are white. They are very sweet when they are fully ripe. The long straight stems can be used to make spears, and smaller stems can be made into firesticks.
bulpbulp-ba       
coverb (tr.)
dialect HL, PH
 
to sprinkle
Gahan salt bulpbulp me-ge ngonggo dangany-ga! 'Sprinkle the salt on your tucker!' (HL)
buluman       
nominal
variant buluhman (HL)
stem buluma-
 
big
Bulu-buluman gakgawurin ngi-ma-jan. 'We used to get really big long yams.' (LM, text)
Biyakgin buluman ya-ngga-jan buggy-garang. 'My big sister used to go with the buggy.' (LM, text)
Wal ba-yama-ny-guju-ma buluman. 'The two of them grew up big.' (LM, text)
 
see also birriman, dabuluman.
bulundu       
nominal
dialect HL
 
dilly bag
bum-ma       
coverb (tr.)
   1.
to smoke
Goron gahan bum-ma bu-ni. 'He smoked the house.'
   2.
to cook
Guda-ga me-ge nginyang, gahan lamang, bum-ma mi-na-wu nginyang, lamang. 'Put the beef on the fire and cook it for us!'
   3.
to set alight
Guda-yi, bum-ma, bum gunyju-na-ma, lawel-garang. Gi-yu yurrup-ba, guda-leying. 'The fire might set your clothes alight. You're standing too close to the fire.'
bunggurrun       
nominal
 
myrtlewood Lophostemon grandiflorus
 
see also jinggul.
bu-ni       
infl. verb (tr.)
variant bu-ndi (HL, opt.)
root -bu-; past -ni ~ -ndi; ppfv -ng
   1.
to hit
Mangima-giwu ba-bu-ni-guju. Jolo-jolo. Yawey bunggu-bu-ni-guju. Ngun jek ba-yu-nginy-guju gahan marluga-giwu. 'The two policemen hit them. They pissed themselves. Yes, they hit them. They shat themselves, those two old men.' (LM, text)
   2.
to kill
Gahan larima manggu-bu-guju! 'I'm going to kill the two of you!' (LM, text)
Wihya jamba gi-bu gahan marluga! 'No, you can't kill that old man!' (LM, text)
   3.
to do something involving impact or violence (in complex predicates)
Denh-denh bu-ng maburrburr. 'He cut him up into pieces.' (LM, text)
Jahan-gu durrp-ba ngu-bu-ni gahan. 'Why did you lot poke it?' (LM, text)
   4.
to do (a general transitive auxiliary in complex predicates)
Bewh ngi-bu-ng gahan lari, Dry Creek. 'We crossed that creek, Dry Creek.' (LM, text)
Murlanyh bu-ng-ma garatjjin. 'She parted the grass.' (LM, text)
Yiyimimi ga-bu-n danganyin. 'He is being possessive of the tucker.' (HL)
bunit       
nominal
dialect LM
 
body, corpse
Bunit berrh ba-ga-ng, ba-ge-na-guju wah-leying. 'They threw the body into the water.' (LM, text)
bunubun       
nominal
dialect HL, PH, LL
 
file snake Acrochordus arafurae
 
note: The flesh is eaten and is considered excellent food. These snakes are found in swamps and billabongs, but they are not common on Wagiman country.
bunyjup-ba       
coverb (intr.)
 
to be belly down
Bunyjup-ba ga-guk-ga-n. 'He's sleeping belly down.' (LM)
buran       
nominal
variant bohran (HL)
stem bura-
 
boomerang
Berrh-ma nga-ra-ndi, buran, jorro di-nginy nganung. 'I threw a boomerang, and it came back to me.' (PH)
burbur       
nominal
 
wing
Burbur-yi bilh-bil-ma nga-ma-ji-ng. 'I fanned myself with a wing.' (LM)
 
see also burbur-garang.
burbur-garang       
nominal
 
aeroplane
Yawey burbur-garang gahan bilh-bil-ma ga-ya yimbama. 'Yes, those planes are always flying.' (LM)
 
see also burbur.
burrh-ma       
coverb (intr.)
 
to slap your hands on your thighs
Barlarrin ge-na nganung burrh-burrh-ma ma-ya-min, wangga-gu. 'He painted me with white ochre, I'm going to dance wangga slapping my hands on my thighs.' (LM)
burrkgi-ma       
coverb (ambitr.)
   1.
to roll about
Jahan-gu-bi dirdi-dirdit-da ga-ya gahan lamara? Jip-ba ga-yu menuny mornen. Burrkgi-ma ga-ma-ji-n. 'Why is that dog rolling around? Maybe it has an itchy back. It's rolling about.' (LM)
   2.
to wrestle
Burrkgi-ma ngi-ma-ji-na-guju. 'We were wrestling.' (LM)
burrngburrng-nga       
coverb (intr.)
   1.
to boil
Gayh-gorden-yi burrngburrng-nga ga-ba-ma-n nganing-gin-ba borndehdi-ba. 'They're boiling it up in my billycan.' (HL)
Burrngburrng-nga ga-na-n wahan? 'Is the water boiling?' (HL)
   2.
to bubble up
Labulbul burrngburrng-nga everywhere ni-nginy gahan labulbul. 'Blood came bubbling up everywhere.' (HL, text)
burrupburru       
nominal
 
skin disease, such as scabies, ringworm or prickleheat
Gumit-ba ga-ga-n, burrupburru. 'He has a skin disease.' (HL)
burruwaran       
nominal
 
large bat sp.
but-da       
coverb (tr.)
 
to roast in ashes
Lamang walanyja ba-bu-jan, but ngi-bu-jan. 'They used to kill goannas, and we would roast them in the ashes.' (LM, text)
buwh-ma       
coverb (tr.)
dialect HL, PH
 
to blow (with mouth)
Buwh-ma mi-bu guda! 'Blow on the fire!' (HL)
buyal       
nominal
 
gammon
Ga-gobe-n gahan nganung. Buyal ga-ma-ji-n. 'She's lying to me. She's gammon.' (LM)
buyp-ba       
coverb (intr.)
variant bulp-ba (PH)
 
to be smoky-eyed
Bulp-ba ngaanda-n, nibulin ngagun lihwa. 'My vision is hazy, my eyes are no good.' (PH)
 
see also nu-buyp-ba.

Copyright 1999-2001 AIATSIS, Stephen Wilson. Comments and enquiries to Stephen Wilson <stephenw@ucla.edu>.