Ww

waduwadu       
nominal
 
cousin
wagalmiyan       
nominal
 
rifle fish
wagiman       
nominal
stem wagima-
 
the language of the Wagiman people
Wagima-garang yaha-ny nganung. 'She spoke to me in Wagiman.' (LM, text)
Gornkorn-na nga-ya-nggi Wagiman, wayi-gama. 'I spoke Wagiman when I was a kid.' (LM)
wahan       
nominal
stem wah-
   1.
water
"Gahan murrkgun berrh many-ba-ra wah-leying" yaha-ny. '"I'll throw the three of you in the water" he said.' (LM, text)
Gi-dip-ba-n-ngana wahan gu-rinyi-min. 'We'll make it rain.' (LM, text)
   2.
beer
Gahan mamin yimbama ga-da wahan-ma. 'That white man is always drinking beer.' (LM)
 
see also dagelin.
wajarra       
nominal
 
red flying fox Pteropus scapulatus
Jaley-ma ga-ba-yu wiri-laying wajarra. 'The flying foxes are hanging in the trees.' (LM)
 
note: These flying foxes were hunted with throwing sticks and light spears in the past and are now hunted with shotguns. They can be cooked in a ground oven or just straight on a fire. They have a strong, pleasant fruity smell and after eating flying foxes people smell like this too.
wakban       
nominal
 
alone, by yourself
Gahan jilimakgun bort-da-yi nung-gin wambaru ga-yu wakban marluga. 'His wife died, so now the old man just sits alone.' (LM)
Wihya ngagun wakban ma-di mahan. 'No, I will eat this myself.' (LM)
Jahan-gunda ga-ba-nawu-ji-n-giwu matjjin? Wakban-wu gornkorn-na ga-ba-ya-giwu. 'Why are they talking to each other. They're talking by themselves.' (PH)
wakgala       
nominal
   1.
paperbark Melaleuca spp.
note: This term is used for all paperbarks.
Mabitjbarran ngi-guk-ga-jan, wakgala-garang barh-may-gu, gunyja-ba. Wakgala lort-day-gu. 'In the olden days we used to sleep, using paperbark to make a bed on the ground. The paperbark was for covering us up.' (LM)
   2.
paper, letter, book
Wakgala jowk nga-ra-ng ngonggo. 'I sent a letter to you.' (PH)
   3.
paper money
Jamba warri-buga gahan mi-nawu wakgala! 'Don't give the paper money to the kids!' (LM)
wakgawakga       
nominal
   1.
orphan
Wakgawakga ga-ya mahan warren. Ngalagunin-nehen, nirra-mang bort-da-yi ganya. 'This kid is an orphan. He has no mother, and his father died too.' (LM)
   2.
something which nobody wants
Lihwa bula-ndi shirt lihwa wakgawakga, dorh nga-ma-ny. 'Someone left the shirt because they didn't want it, so I picked it up.' (HL)
 
see also wakma.
wakma       
nominal
   1.
orphan
   2.
someone who has lost a close relative
Wakma ga-ya gahan marluga. Jilimakgun bort-da-yi nung-gin. 'That old man has lost a close relative. His wife died.' (LM)
 
see also wakgawakga.
wakwak       
nominal
 
Torresian crow Corvus orru
walabang       
nominal
 
hunting
Langawarin-gu walabang ngi-ya-nggi, nu-naw-ma jilimakgun. 'We went hunting for turtles, all of us women.' (LM)
Maman walabang-gu ga-ya gahan marluga. 'That old man is good at hunting.' (LM)
walaju       
nominal
 
white cockatoo, also called sulphur-crested cockatoo Cacatua galerita
 
see also werrkwerrk.
walala       
nominal
   1.
womb
   2.
placenta
walalurr       
nominal
 
milkwood
walangga       
nominal
 
water chestnut Eleocharis dulcis
 
note: The small tubers can be eaten raw or roasted. They are sweet and tasty and grow in profusion around billabongs and swamps. The tubers are also eaten by magpie geese.
walanyja       
nominal
 
goanna Varanus panoptes
Walanyja durdurt ya-nginy, ngarrmen lem du-ng. 'The goanna ran into the hollow log.' (HL)
walbaga       
nominal
 
water buffalo Bubalus bubalis
 
note: This word comes from the English 'wild bugger'.
walbararri       
nominal
 
milky way
Danurrut-da ga-yu walbararri. 'The milky way lies across the sky.' (HL)
wal-ma       
coverb (intr.)
   1.
to grow
Warren wayi-tjjalbu yu-nginy-ma gahan lamarra. Buluman na-ni now. Wal-ma-yi. 'That dog was a little baby before. Now it's gotten big. It has grown up.' (LM)
Mundupban gahan maman. Bora-laying, ga-wal-ma-n. 'Mundupban is good. It grows by the river.' (LM, text)
   2.
to raise
"Mani-nawu gahan warren! Nugan ma-gundu wal-ma-ra" yaha-ny. '"Give me the kid! I will keep him and raise him," he said.' (LM, text)
walngaran       
nominal
stem walngara-
   1.
cliff
Walngara-ba linyi-ra. 'He fell off the cliff.' (HL)
   2.
riverbank
Walngara-ba dup-ba-ma gorlondin, walbaga gahan. 'He's in the jungle on the riverbank, that buffalo.' (LM)
walyakgin       
nominal
 
flash
Walyakgin ga-ya gahan mamin. Lawel ga-nanda-ji-n. 'That white man thinks he's really flash. He looks at his own clothes.' (LM)
wambaru       
particle
variant wambar (HL)
 
just
Jamba mu-badi-ji-ji-ja-guju! Wambaru mu-yu-guju maji-yan! 'Don't you two bite each other! Just play!' (LM)
Ngego-guju mayiwa-giwu nge-yobe-jan-guju wambarru. 'My sister and I just used to stay by ourselves.' (LM, text)
Nga-ya wambarru benybeny nga-ya ma-di jorro-ma gawor. 'I'm just going for a little while. I'll come back this afternoon.' (LM)
wamdal       
nominal
 
chest
wamu       
nominal
 
black flying fox Pteropus alecto
 
note: This larger flying fox is hunted and cooked in the same way as wajarra, the red flying fox.
wamuk-ga       
coverb (tr.)
 
to hug
Gahan wamuk-wamuk-ga ngan-ga-n, gahan wihya, wuji nga-nga-laikge-ma-n gahan. 'She's always hugging me, and that's no good, I don't like it.' (LM)
wangalanggu       
nominal
 
cold night wind
 
see also bolwon.
wangamarin       
nominal
stem wangama-
 
fly
Wangamarin ga-di-n lem-lem-ma goro-leying. 'Flies are coming into the house.' (LM)
wanganyjarri       
nominal
   1.
armpit
Wanganyjarri-leying diny-nya nga-yu. 'My armpit is itching.' (LL)
   2.
green ants' nest
wangardin       
nominal
 
yam sp. Vigna sp.
 
note: This long thin yam can be dug up and eaten.
wangga       
nominal
 
corroboree
Wangga, marluga-giwu wangga ba-bu-ji-n-guju. 'The two old men made a wangga corroboree.' (LM)
wanggayh-ma       
coverb (intr.)
 
to be clear, open (of country)
Wanggayh-ma ga-yu lahan, ngerreju. 'Our country is clear, open country.' (LM)
wangirrk-ga       
coverb (intr.)
   1.
to drown
Wangirrk-ga ya-nggi gahan warren wayi-tjjalbu. 'The little boy drowned.' (LM)
   2.
to sink
Wangirrk ya-nggi gahan nganku, wenan. Wel-garang, ma-larrp-ba-yin. 'The what's it sank, the canoe. It had holes in it, it was cracked.' (LM)
 
see also ngirrk-ga.
wangu       
nominal
 
widow or widower
Gahan ngal-martdiwa wakma ga-ya. Lagiban bort-da-yi nung-gin. Wangu ga-ya. 'That old woman is bereaved. Her husband has died. She is a widow.' (LM)
wanh-na       
coverb (tr.)
 
to leave
Darrp-darrp nge-ge-ng-guju wanh ngi-bula-ng lawel. 'We hung out the sheets and left them.' (LM, text)
 
see also bula-ndi.
warabenyin       
nominal
dialect HL, PH, LL
variant garabenyin (LL)
 
banded tree snake, also called milk snake Boiga irregularis
 
note: These snakes are reputed to creep up on women when they are sleeping, and drink the milk from their breasts.
 
see also ngapbunyngapbunyban.
waram       
nominal
 
side
Dul-ma ga-yu waram-ba. 'He's sleeping on his side.' (LM)
waray-ma       
coverb (tr.)
dialect HL
 
to pester, to humbug
Danganyin-gu, waray-ma ganggu-ga-n. 'He's pestering them for tucker.' (HL)
wardan       
nominal
variant wahrdan (HL)
stem warda-
 
saltwater crocodile Crocodylus porosus
Wardan buluman, wurrpbu-leying ga-yu. 'The big saltwater crocodiles live in the salt water.' (LL)
 
note: Saltwater crocodiles can be captured by tying the jaws shut with rope made from kurrajong and tying paperbark over the eyes to quieten them. They are then carried back to camp and killed with an axe. Small to middle sized crocodiles are preferred, as large ones are dangerous and difficult to handle. All parts of the tail, legs, back and internal organs are eaten. The flesh may be roasted on coals or cooked in a ground oven. The eggs can also be collected, cooked and eaten, however this is very dangerous.
wardi       
nominal
 
kapok bush, also called wild cotton Cochlospermum fraseri
 
note: The fleshy tap-root can be dug up and eaten. It is quite fibrous and it has to be cooked and pounded first to soften it. Young plants have more tender tap-roots. Yellow flowers on this yam indicate that kangaroos and turtles are fat and it is a good time to hunt them. The wool from the split fruit can be used to dip honey out of sugarbag. It is attached to the end of a stick and poked through cracks and holes into bee hives, then drawn out and the honey sucked off.
wardirrk       
nominal
 
young girl
wardit       
nominal
 
damper
Ngalma-ngal-martdiwa wardit ga-ba-dipba-n. 'The old ladies are making damper.' (LM)
warh-ma       
coverb (intr.)
   1.
to ride
Ah hey barri-miya warh-ma ga-ma-n mahan nendo? 'Hey, who is riding this horse?' (LM, text)
   2.
to sit astride
Warh-ma ga-ni wir-ba. 'He's sitting astride a log.' (HL)
   3.
to piggyback
Warh-ma ga-ga-n nendo-nendo gahan, warren nung-gin, niji-mang-yi. 'Uncle is giving his kid a piggyback.' (LM)
warhwar-ma       
coverb (intr.)
 
to fly
Ngalalak ya-nggi warh-warh-ma. 'The corella flew away.'
warkgany       
nominal
 
clever fellow, killer
warlang       
nominal
   1.
ghost bat Macroderma gigas
   2.
big-eared
Lamarra gahan warlang. 'That dog has big ears.' (HL)
 
note: Colonies of this bat live in caves and old mine shafts around Pine Creek.
warle-na       
infl. verb (tr.)
root -warle-; past -na; fut - ~ -na; also warle-yh n.f. pfv
 
to tell off, to growl
Ngohgo warreh-buga, nyenh-na mi-ni! Ngal-gawu-mang-yi, warle-yh munggu-ya! 'You kids, be quiet. Your grannie will growl you!' (HL)
Jahan-gu gi-warle-n yimbama gahan warren wayi-tjjalbu? Mi-bula-ma! 'Why do you tell that kid off all the time? Leave him alone!' (LM)
warnambi       
nominal
dialect HL, PH, LL, LMcM
 
blind snake, legless lizard sp. Ramphotyphlops spp.
warnanggal       
nominal
   1.
witch doctor, clever fellow
Warnanggal-yi buga-ndi-ma, nyongh-nga ga-yu now, buga-ndi-ma, yarrindi-yi. 'The witch doctor sang him and now he is sick.'
   2.
doctor
Warnanggal ngan-nga-ndi, wolwol liwa nga-ya. Nyongh-nga nga-yu. 'The doctor listened to my bad heart. I'm sick.'
   3.
clever
 
see also barrakbarrak.
warnbarra       
nominal
 
cherabin Macrobrachium rosenbergii
Warnbarra ngi-ma-jan langganin gahan, Bumji ga-yu, Oolloo-leying. 'We used to get cherabin at Bumji, at Oolloo station.' (LM)
warnbik       
nominal
 
four corner fruit Cynanchum pedunculatum
 
note: The fruit can be eaten. It is best to eat before it gets to full size, because it is more tender then. If the fruit is too hard, it can be softened by lightly roasting on a fire.
warnwarn       
nominal
 
lying down
Warnwarn mi-yu gay-ba! 'Lie down there!' (LM)
warragan       
nominal
 
ground sugarbag
warrak       
nominal
dialect HL, LL, GH
 
catfish Hexanematichthys leptaspis
 
see also jalunggin.
warral-ma       
coverb (intr.)
 
to go bush
Warral-ma ya-nginy menuny ga-ndi danganyin. 'He's run away into the bush, maybe because he stole some tucker.' (HL)
warratj-ja       
coverb (intr.)
 
to dance (of women)
"Jahan-gu warratj-ja gi-ya?" ba-yama-ny nung. '"Why are you dancing?" they asked her.' (LM, text)
warren       
nominal
variant wahrren (HL, opt.)
stem warri- ~ warreh- (HL)
 
child
Warren mahan ma-bula-min gay-ubawo, school-gu gu-ya. 'I will leave this kid there, and she will go to school.' (LM, text)
Warri-buga ba-di-nya. 'The children came.' (LM, text)
warrik-ga       
coverb (tr.)
 
to take away from
Jimirndirr warrik mehe warren! 'Take the knife off the kid!' (HL)
warritjjin       
nominal
 
sweat, perspiration
Warritjjin ngan-bu-n. 'I'm sweating.' (LM)
warrkwarrk       
nominal
dialect LMcM
 
black nailfish Neosilurus ata
 
see also libiyin.
warr-ma       
coverb (tr.)
 
to be too big
Warr-ma ngan-ma-n lawel mahan. 'This dress is too big for me.' (LM)
warrp-ba       
coverb (intr.)
 
to be in a big mob
Nu-naw-ma warrp-ba ga-ba-yu, lah-laying. 'Lots of them are sitting down at camp in a big mob.' (LL)
waruk       
nominal
 
hawk sp.
watj-ja       
coverb (intr.)
 
to finish
Worrok-worrok ngi-yu-nginy-gujuuuu larrang. Larrang-nga ya-nggi now watj-ja ngi-ma-ny. 'Us two washed and washed until daybreak. At daybreak we finished.' (LM, text)
Queensland, ba-ya-nggi school, gay-giwu warri-giwu. Watj, jorro ba-di-nginy-guju. 'Those two kids went to school in Queensland. When they finished, they came back.' (LM, text)
 
see also watj-ja-wu.
watj-ja-wu       
nominal
 
all, completely
"Lamang ngu-da-yi-ma langawarin?" "Yawey!" Ngi-da-yi watj-ja-wu! '"Have you lot eaten the turtle?" "Yes!" We ate it all up!' (LM, text)
Watj-ja-wu ga-ba-yu no-dew-ma gumit. 'They have all (your whole family) got really white skin.' (HL)
Dorroh-dorroh ngi-ma-ny now garatjjin, watj-ja-wu. Dabali-ma ngi-ya-ngga-jan watj-ja-wu. 'We pulled out the grass, the whole lot. We went all around.' (LM, text)
Aeroplane nung-gin bak-bak-ga-yi watj-ja-wu. 'His aeroplane was completely broken up.' (LM, text)
 
see also watj-ja, la-watj-ja-wu.
watjjorrng-nga       
coverb (tr.)
 
to waste
Watjjorrng ngi-bu-ni danganyin ngonggo-gin. 'You've wasted your tucker.' (LL)
 
see also bang-nga.
wayibin       
nominal
variants weyibin (HL), wayiben (LL)
 
northern quoll, also called native cat Dasyurus hallucatus
 
see also galambu.
wayigun       
nominal
variant weyigun (HL)
 
hairbelt
waying       
nominal
dialect HL, PH, LL
 
snake sp.
wayi-tjjalbu       
nominal
 
small
Lihwa-tjjondony mahan lamang wayi-tjjalbu. 'These small animals are no good.' (LM, text)
 
see also weyiny, weyehweye.
weh-ma       
coverb (intr.)
 
to vomit
Ga-yu weh-ma ngonggo-gin warren. 'Your kid is vomiting.' (HL)
Ngonggo-gin wayi-tjjalbu-yi weh ngan-yahany, lari-leying. 'Your baby has vomited on my arm.' (LL)
wek-ga       
coverb (tr.)
 
to swallow
Wutjbin-yi wek-ga nga-ra-ndi. Da-buluman wek-wek nga-ra-ng. 'Greedily I swallowed it down. I swallowed a very big piece.' (LM)
welek-ga       
coverb (intr.)
 
to be light
Wilh-ma ga-ya dangak-ga gahan gakgalak-gu-ma. Welek-ga ga-yu. 'He is walking along looking up at the moon. It is shining.'
Ngaralin welek mama ga-di-n. Menuny wahan gu-rinyi birriman. 'Lightning is coming, making it light. Maybe there will be a big storm.'
Bilbil-ma mi-bu welek gu-ma. 'Blow on it (the fire) and it will light up.'
weletjban       
nominal
dialect HL
 
red-winged parrot Aprosmictus erythropterus
welin       
nominal
stem wel-
   1.
hole
Jahan-gu gurrh-ma gu-ma-n gahan welin? 'Why are you lot digging that hole?' (PH)
   2.
cave
Welin-leying lem ngi-yebe-jan guk. 'We used to sleep in caves.' (LL, text)
wel-ma       
coverb (intr.)
   1.
to spread out
Wel nga-bu-ng gahan lahan. 'I spread out the swag.'
Barrakbarrak wel-ma ga-yu. 'The diver duck is spreading its wings.'
   2.
to take off
Beworn ya-nggi wel-ma garra-gunda, dipbart-dipbart-da ya-nggi. 'The rock wallaby took off from the rock, and jumped away.'
wenan       
nominal
 
canoe
Wenan gahan-ma, wangirrk-ga ya-nggi. 'The canoe sank.' (LM)
weng-nga       
coverb (intr.)
   1.
to be open
Gahan ngal-door weng-nga ga-yu. 'The door is open.'
Jup-ba ga-yu. Weng mi-ma ngerre-ngana! 'It's shut. Open it for us!'
   2.
to be empty
Goron mahan weng-nga ga-yu. Nu-naw-ma watj-ja ba-ya-nggi. Goron-binyju ga-yu weng-nga. 'This house is empty. Everyone has gone. There's only an empty house.'
Weng-nga ga-yu welin mayh-ba. 'There's a hole here.' (HL)
wenyan       
nominal
 
floodwater
Wenyan gi-boro-n wahan. Wenyan ga-ya gahan tap now. Ngi-bula-ndi durdurt-da wahan. 'You've made a flood of water. Water is flooding from the tap. You left the water running.' (HL)
wern-na       
coverb (intr.)
 
to make trouble
 
see also no-wern-na.
werretjjanyin       
nominal
variant werretjjenyin (HL, PH)
 
red-collared lorikeet Trichoglossus haemotodus
"Weletj weletj" ga-yu gayh-ma. '"Weletj weletj" it sings out.' (HL)
 
see also werretjwerretj.
werretjwerretj       
nominal
variant weletjweletj (HL)
 
red-collared lorikeet Trichoglossus haemotodus
 
see also werretjjanyin.
werriny-bu-ni       
infl. verb (tr.)
variant werriny-bu-ndi (HL, opt.)
root -werriny-bu-; past -ni ~ -ndi; also werriny-bu-yh n.f. pfv
 
to sing
Ga-werriny-bu-n-yarra wahan ga-rega-n. 'She is singing to bring the rain.' (LM)
Ba-werriny-bu-ni gahan ngal-martdiwa, yarrindi-garang, bort yany now. 'They sang the old lady with a yarrindi song, and she died.' (LM)
Ngal-martdiwa gahan Bilmarray-ma, nganku wahan werriny-bu-yh ya-jan. 'That old woman Bilmarray used to sing the rain.' (LM, text)
 
see also werrinyin.
werrinyin       
nominal
 
corroboree
Werrinyin ba-bu-jan mahan, Oenpelli mob. 'They used to make a corroboree here, the Oenpelli mob.' (LM, text)
 
see also werriny-bu-ni.
werrkwerrk       
nominal
 
white cockatoo, also called sulphur-crested cockatoo Cacatua galerita
 
see also walaju.
werr-ma       
coverb (intr.)
   1.
to come out, to emerge
Nu-naw-ma Wagima-garang, gawor-nyamu werr ba-di-jan. 'Lots of Wagiman people used to come out in the afternoon.' (PH, text)
Ngurrun ga-di-n werr-ma. 'The sun is coming out.' (LM, text)
Boyh ngi-ya-ngga-jan wilh-ma magu, Douglas, werr. 'We used to set off walkabout, come out at Douglas Station.' (LM, text)
"Jamba gu-ya-guju werr-ma!" yaha-ny. '"Don't you two go outside!" he said.' (LM, text)
   2.
to appear
Ngaba nganing-gin ga-di-n mahan. Barri-ba-gunda werr-ma di-nya? 'My son is coming up here. Where has he appeared from?' (LM)
wert-da       
coverb (intr.)
 
to look back
Wert nga-yu-nginy nga-nanda-yi gay-giwu ba-ya-nggi-guju. 'I looked back and saw those two going along.'
wertwert       
nominal
 
greedy
Wertwert ga-ya gahan ngal-martdiwa. Wuji gunggu-nawu-ja danganyin gahan ngal-martdiwa. 'That old lady is greedy. She won't give you tucker, that old lady.' (LM)
 
see also no-wertwert-da.
wewa       
nominal
 
stealing, thieving
Wewa-yi ma-yi danganyin nganing-gin may-gunda. 'He stole my tucker from here.' (LM)
Wewa ngi-ma-yi garradin nganing-gin. 'You've stolen my money.' (PH)
 
see also no-wewa, wewa-yan.
wewa-yan       
n.f. verb (impfv., intr.)
 
stealing
 
see also wewa, no-wewa.
weyehweye       
nominal
 
very small
Lamarra-yi buga-ndi weyehweye lamarra. 'The dog gave birth to the little puppies.' (HL)
 
see also weyiny, wayi-tjjalbu.
weyh-ma       
coverb (tr.)
 
to lift
Weyh mi-ma nganung gahan garradin! 'Lift the rock up for me!' (PH)
weyiny       
nominal
 
small
Pamngurlu weyiny gokgo. 'Pamngurlu was still small.' (LM)
 
see also wayi-tjjalbu, weyehweye.
weypbun       
nominal
variant wepbun (HL)
 
mussel
wibin       
nominal
stem wibi-
 
newly burnt grass
Dil-ma ba-ra-ndi. Wibin ga-yu lahan. 'They set it on fire. Now the grass is burnt.'
 
see also bindirin2.
wihya       
interjection
   1.
no
Gurruwitj gahan lihwa ma-yi. Town-ga gu-ya-nggi wihya, gu-yu dup-ba lah-leying. 'The car was no good. You lot wanted to go to town, but no, you have to stay in camp.' (LM)
"Mi-bula mayh-leying" yaha-ny. "Wihya-ngala nibulin ga-ya nganung ma-ga-min" yaha-ny. '"You leave her here," he said. "No, she is my girlfriend and I'm going to take her" he said.' (LM)
Wihya jamba gi-bu gahan marluga! 'No, you cannot shoot the old man!' (LM, text)
   2.
nothing
Ngi-ya-ngga-jan gorr-ma jorro, but gitjjiya-di wihya. 'We used to go fishing and come back, but now, nothing.' (LM, text)
wik-ga1       
coverb (intr.)
 
to have a tickle in your throat
Wik-ga nga-ni, mangurdal. 'I've got a tickle in my throat.'
wik-ga2       
coverb (tr.)
dialect HL, PH
variant wilk-ga (PH)
 
to sip
Mani-nawu wik ma-ma ngonggo tea! 'Give me a sip of your tea!' (HL)
wik-ga3       
coverb (intr.)
 
to wriggle
Wik-ga-wik-ga ga-yu warren wayi-tjjalbu. Ma-gondo gokgo ngapbuny ma-nawu. 'The baby is wriggling. I'll hold him and give him milk.' (LM)
wilh-ma       
coverb (intr.)
   1.
to walk
Wilh-ma ga-ya dangak-ga gahan gakgalak-gu-ma. 'He is walking along looking up at the moon.' (LM)
Gumurrinyji-yi, nu-naw-ma lamarra ganggu-ga-n wilh-ma. 'Emu is taking all his dogs for a walk.' (PH)
   2.
to go
Magu ya-nggi town-ga wilh-ma. 'He went to town.' (LM)
   3.
to go walkabout
Guwardagun-leying wilh-ma ngi-ya-ngga-jan. 'We used to go walkabout in the Daly River country.' (LL, text)
Durrin werr-ma ya-nggi gay-gunda welin magu ga-ya wilh-ma. Walabang ga-ya. 'The snake has come out from its hole and it's going walkabout. It's going hunting.' (LM)
wilikwilik       
nominal
 
galah Cacatua roseicapilla
wilit       
nominal
dialect HL, PH
 
tree spp. Wrightia pubescens & saligna
 
note: The pale light timber is strong and can be used to make small spears.
wilitjwilitj-ja       
coverb (tr.)
 
to stir
Tea gahan wilitjwilitj mi-bu! 'Stir the tea!' (LM)
 
see also gulitj-ja.
wilmurr       
nominal
 
wire spear
Wilmurr-garang, ma-re-ja gahan majalin. 'I'll spear the fish with a wire spear.' (PH)
 
see also wilmurr-garang.
wilmurr-garang       
nominal
 
cow
Larima larima ya-ngga-jan nganku wilmurr-garang. 'Two by two they used to walk up, the what's its, the cows.' (LM)
 
note: Wilmurr is the word for a wire spear, and wilmurr-garang is used because the horns of cattle are like spears.
 
see also wilmurr.
winduk       
nominal
dialect HL
 
bush stone-curlew Burhinus grallarius
 
see also guwerek.
winini       
nominal
dialect HL
 
white-throated honeyeater Melithreptus albogularis
 
note: This bird sings out when people are approaching. It is considered a nuisance because it often warns prey of the approach of hunters.
wirin       
nominal
stem wir- ~ wiri-
 
tree
Wirin-gunda lek-ga mi-di! 'Come down from that tree!' (PH)
 
note: This is the general word for any kind of tree.
wirnh-na       
coverb (intr.)
 
to whistle
Wirnh-na ga-ya gahan warren wayi-tjjalbu. 'That kid is whistling.' (LM)
Gahan lagiban wirnh-wirn-nay-garang ga-di-n. 'That whistling boy is coming up.' (LM)
wirrh-ma1       
coverb (tr.)
   1.
to hit with a stick
Wirrh-ma gu-ba-bu-min. 'They will kill them with a stick'
   2.
to demolish
Gahan goron mabitjbarran-gunda ngerreju wirrh-ma ba-bu-ng. 'They demolished our old house.'
wirril-ma       
coverb (intr.)
 
to be red
Nibulin mahan wirril ngi-yama-jan. 'Our eyes used to go red (from swimming in Douglas Hot Springs).' (LM, text)
 
see also nu-wirril-ma.
wirriny-nya       
coverb (intr.)
   1.
to go around, to turn around
Gay-gunda gordal wirriny-nya nga-ya-nggi. 'From that (a bad fall) my head was spinning.' (PH, text)
Gordal liwa-tjjondony. Gongorrk wirriny mama ga-ya. 'He is no good in the head. His brains go round and round.'
   2.
to turn over
Wirriny-h yaha-ny labingan gahan bunjubup linyi-ng. 'The baby turned over onto its belly.'
Wirriny-wirriny ngi-ra-ng-guju. 'We turned it (a turtle) over.'
   3.
to toss and turn
Wirriny-wirriny nga-guk-ga-yi. 'I was tossing and turning in my sleep.'
   4.
to change
Gahan lahan yimbama wirriny-wirriny ga-ra-ji-n. 'The country is always changing.'
 
see also wordow-ma.
wirritwirrit       
nominal
 
rainbow bee eater Merops ornatus
 
note: This bird eats small insects and bees and is often seen around water swooping for insects.
wirrp-ba       
coverb (tr.)
variant wirrk-ga (PH)
   1.
to wipe
Danganyin ge-gondo-n, damorom-ba. Mi-ya-ngga, wirrp mi-bu! 'You've got food on your face. Go and wipe it off!' (HL)
   2.
to rub
Wirrp-ba ngan-bu-n, gurnagun-yi mornen. 'She's rubbing my back with fat.' (HL)
   3.
to roll up
Wolo-yi ga-ba-ma-n now wirrp-ba. 'They roll it up (sand palm) with grass.' (HL, text)
wirtwirt-da       
coverb (tr.)
dialect HL, PH
 
to whistle (of the wind, through grass or trees)
Wirtwirt-da ga-bu-n wolon. 'The grass is whistling (in the wind).' (PH)
witjjirrin       
nominal
 
quinine tree Petalostigma pubescens & quadriloculare
 
note: Emus eat the fruit of this tree, which are bitter and are not eaten by people. Petalostigma pubescens grows in thickets on hill sides whereas Petalostigma quadriloculare is a small plant which grows in rocky areas.
woerrkge-ma       
coverb (intr.)
 
to work
"Jamba nga-nga-yu woerrkge-ma ngorroju!" yaha-ny. '"I won't stay here to work for you mob!" she said.' (LM)
 
note: This is a borrowing from the English 'work'.
wojolong       
nominal
variant woyolong (PH)
 
red-tailed black whip snake
wojorrk-ga       
coverb (intr.)
variant wujurrk-ga (HL)
 
to be loose
Nimurdal wujurrk-ga ga-yu. 'His tooth is loose.' (LM)
wolborin       
nominal
 
myrtlewood Lophostemon lactifluus
 
note: The tree has papery bark like a melaleuca. It provides a cool dense shade.
wolngh-nga       
coverb (intr.)
   1.
to be hanging
Wolngh-wolng-nga ga-yu gahan, jahan wirin-ma? 'What's that hanging up in the tree?' (LM)
   2.
to be tied up
Lamarra ga-yu wolngh-nga now. 'The dog is tied up now.' (HL)
wolok       
nominal
   1.
high
Darrp me-ge wolok lamarra-gunda! 'Put it up high so the dogs won't get it!' (HL)
   2.
top
   3.
high country
Galh-ma-yan ba-ya-ngga-jan danganyin ga-ya wolok. 'They used to climb up because there is tucker in the high country.' (PH, text)
wolon       
nominal
stem wolo-
 
grass
Wolon-leying nu-naw-ma jamh-ma-yan ba-ya-ngga-jan nendo. 'A big mob of horses used to feed on the grass.' (PH, text)
 
note: This is the general word for any kind of grass.
wolwol       
nominal
   1.
heart
Wolwol dipbart-dipbart ga-ya nganung. 'My heart is beating rapidly.'
Gahan neyenggun marluga wolwol maman ga-ya, lut-day-gu. 'That other old man is soft-hearted for giving.'
   2.
viscera
Jerrkjerrk nga-gondo-n. Wolwol lihwa nga-ya. 'I've got diarrhoea. My innards are no good.'
wombern-na       
coverb (intr.)
dialect HL, PH
 
to make a constant sound
Nga-nga-n wombern-na ga-yu barri barnanyin? 'I can hear a sound (i.e.. the sound of bees), where is the sugarbag?' (HL)
wongh-nga       
coverb (intr.)
 
to miss your country
Wongh-nga nga-yu nganing-gin-gu lah-gu. 'I am missing my country.' (HL)
wordow-ma       
coverb (tr.)
dialect HL
   1.
to turn over
Lamang gahan lerrh-ma ga-na-n. Wordow mi-ma! 'The meat is getting burnt. Turn it over!' (HL)
   2.
to turn into a dreaming
Ngalalak jilimakgun ba-ya-ngga-jan, wordow ma-ji-ng, ngalalak-ga. 'The corella used to be a woman, but it turned into a bird.' (HL)
   3.
to be lumpy
 
see also wirriny-nya.
wornang-nga       
coverb (intr.)
variants wurnang-nga (HL), wornong-nga (LL)
 
to wag your tail
Wornang-wornang ga-yu, lamarra gahan, lagiriny nung-gin. 'That dog is wagging its tail.' (LM)
wornka       
nominal
   1.
missing something
Yawey wornka nga-yu lahan nganing-gin-gu. Ginaman. Nga-bula-ndi lahan nganing-gin. 'Yes, I am missing my country. Poor thing. I've left my country.'
Ngagun nga-yu wornka-wornka, bakga-nehen. 'Me, I'm sitting down with no tobacco.'
   2.
alone
Gay-giwu ga-ba-yu-guju wornka, baba-ya. 'Those two brothers are sitting down alone.'
   3.
lonely
Ga-yu wornka-ma gahan lahan. Garradin-garradin-garang. Wut-da ngi-ma-ny-guju. 'It's lonely, that country. Very very rocky. We didn't like it.'
   4.
deserted
Wutj-wuy ba-ya-nggi. Wo-wornka ga-yu gahan lahan. 'They've all gone. The camp is deserted.'
worr-ma       
coverb (intr.)
 
to be fast asleep
Worr yaha-ny, wuji ga-nga-ja. 'He has fallen fast asleep, and he can't hear us.' (LM)
 
see also guk-ga.
worrobobo       
nominal
variant wurrupbubu (HL, LM, LL)
 
hot
Worrobobo ga-yu gunyjan. Martdal ginggu-berda-n-ngana. 'The ground is hot. It is burning our feet.' (LM)
worrok-ga       
coverb (tr.)
variant worok-ga (HL)
   1.
to wash
Laundry now gi-ya-ngana worrok-gay-ga. 'To the laundry now we go for washing.' (LM, text)
Worrok-gay-gu ga-yu gahan gijalkgin. 'Limestone is for washing clothes.'
Worrok-ga bu-ni lawel. 'She washed the clothes.' (LM, text)
   2.
to sluice
Gahan marluga whitefella ya-nginy worok-worok ni-nginy, gold, worok-ga, ma-yi, gunyjan. 'That old white man went panning for gold.' (HL)
worronggonyin       
nominal
 
green ant
wortngong       
nominal
variant wortngowortngong, wortguwortgu (PH)
 
large frog sp.
 
see also ngalbingay.
wowotj       
nominal
dialect HL, PH, LL
 
rock possum
woyh-ma       
coverb (intr.)
 
to be angry, wild
Woyh yaha-ny ngerra-ngana. 'He got wild at us.'
woyoworrin       
nominal
variant wuyuwurrin (HL)
 
fishing line
Ngalma-ngal-martdiwa durdurt-duy ba-ya-nggi wanh ba-bula-jan, woyoworrin, yawey! 'The old ladies ran away leaving behind all their fishing lines, yes!' (LM, text)
Narn-na bu-ni nganung wuyuwurin. 'My fishing line got hooked up.'
wuhwuh-ma       
coverb (intr.)
 
to be hot
Goron-leying wuhwuh-ma ga-yu. 'It's hot in the house.'
Danganyin gahan gujirritj. Wuhwuh-ma me-berda! 'The tucker is cold. Warm it up!'
wuji       
particle
 
not
Wuji nga-nga-bu-ndi warren. 'I didn't hit the kid.' (HL)
Wuji debet ngi-bu-ng natjjinen. 'You didn't tighten it strongly'
wulman       
nominal
dialect LL
 
sugar glider Petaurus breviceps
 
note: The flesh can be cooked and eaten, although sugar gliders are quite small. They eat flowers and nectar and are generally seen high up in trees.
wumarn       
nominal
variant womarn (LL)
 
casuarina Dolichandrone filiformis
wumbirrh-ma       
coverb (intr.)
 
to make a noise
Wumbirrh-wumbirr-ma ga-ya pigi-pigi-buga. 'The pigs are making a noise.'
wumirr       
nominal
 
ironwood wax
 
see also galin, nerran.
wumurdalyin       
nominal
 
dragonfly
wunggurr       
nominal
variant wuburr (PH, opt.)
 
dust
wunh-na1       
coverb (tr.)
 
to carry
Wunh-na ba-ga-jan ba-rega-ndi berr ba-ra-ng. 'They used to carry it (firewood), they'd bring it and throw it down.' (LM, text)
 
see also ga-ndi.
wunh-na2       
coverb (intr.)
 
to ache
Wunh-na nga-yu martdal. 'My foot is aching.' (HL)
 
see also derdawk-ga.
wunyjitjjin       
nominal
 
red claw yabby Cherax quadricarinatus
wurdlu       
nominal
dialect HL
 
calf
wurduju       
nominal
 
love song
Wurduju ga-ba-bu-n. 'They are singing love songs.' (LM)
wurih-ma       
coverb (intr.)
 
to wriggle along
wurinyjulin       
nominal
 
leaf
 
see also marak.
wurrguru       
nominal
 
devil
 
see also mamin, dirdawung.
wurrpbu       
nominal
variant wurrpbum (HL, PH)
   1.
sea, ocean
Lahan ngerre-gin wurrpbu-nehen. 'Our country has no ocean.' (LL)
   2.
salt water
Wardan buluman, wurrpbu-leying ga-yu. 'The big saltwater crocodiles live in salt water.'
wut-da       
coverb (tr.)
   1.
to be homesick
Nga-ya-wa jorro-ma now Douglas wut-da nga-ma-n. 'I'm going back to Douglas now, I'm homesick.'
   2.
to dislike
Wut-da nga-ma-n gahan lagiban, gu-ya-ngga-ja. 'I don't like that man, let him go.'
wutjbin       
nominal
   1.
greedy
Wutjbin-gin ga-ya gahan nubuny. Ga-da danganyin wek-wek-ga. 'That boy is greedy. He swallows his tucker down.'
Wutjbin-gin ga-ya. Jamba ginggu-nawu-ngana garradin. 'He is greedy. He doesn't give us money.'
   2.
inflamed
Jarruk-yi ngan-ma-n-ma lari mahan. Munya ga-yu, wutjbin ga-yu munya. 'I have a boil here on my arm. It is inflamed, from the pus underneath.'
   3.
a big red falling star
wutj-ja       
coverb (intr.)
 
to scatter
Wakban nga-yu-ma. Neyenggun-a ba-ya-nggi wutj-ja. 'I am alone. The others have scattered.' (LM)
Borlwon wutj-ja ga-ma-n. 'The wind is scattering (the papers).' (HL)
Wutj-ja nga-ra-n nibulin. 'I am scattering seed.' (LL)
Gordal lihwa ga-ya. Wutj ga-ra-n danganyin. Wutj-ja la-ndi. 'She is no good in the head. She throws tucker away. She scattered it.' (LM)
wutjjurrh-ma       
coverb (intr.)
dialect HL, PH, LL
variant wutjjugutjjuk-ga (PH, LL)
 
to rock
Wutjjurrh-ma ga-ma-n wayi-tjjalbu warren. 'She's rocking the kid to sleep.' (HL)
Ngagun nga-ni wutjjurrh-ma mahan chair-ba. 'Me, I'm rocking on this chair.' (HL)
wuyawu       
particle
   1.
all
Lamang wuyawu lamarra-yi ga-ndi. 'The dog took all the meat.'
   2.
also, too
Wirin gi-gondo-n gahan lardili-ba gi-ga-n garatjjin wuyawu. 'You've got sticks in your hair, and grass too.'
wuywuy-ma       
coverb (intr.)
dialect HL
 
to breeze
Bolwon wuywuy-ma ga-yu. 'A breeze is blowing.' (HL)
Wuywuy-ma ma-yu dup-ba mayh-ba. 'I'll sit here in the breeze.' (HL)

Copyright 1999-2001 AIATSIS, Stephen Wilson. Comments and enquiries to Stephen Wilson <stephenw@ucla.edu>.