Language Neuroscience Laboratory

Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

The Language Neuroscience Laboratory is located in the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

About us

Research in the Language Neuroscience Laboratory focuses on understanding the neural basis of language. We combine structural and functional neuroimaging techniques with linguistic analysis to study language processing, and how it breaks down in patients with different kinds of aphasia. We work with patients with aphasias of various etiologies, including stroke and neurodegenerative disease. Language domains of particular interest are syntactic processing and lexical access.

News

March 22, 2019
Neurobiology of Language

The new open access journal Neurobiology of Language launches tomorrow, supported by the Society for the Neurobiology of Language and MIT Press. I'm proud to serve as an inaugural member of the editorial board. Thanks to the editors-in-chief Steve Small and Kate Watkins, and everyone who made this possible.

November 17, 2018
ASHA Research Symposium

I will present some of our recent work as part of the 2018 ASHA Research Symposium "Advances in Neuroplasticity Research: Language Recovery in Aphasia".

October 19, 2018
Workstation

Vintage IBM keyboard molded from Toblerone (among other features)...

August 17, 2018
Society for the Neurobiology of Language, Quebec City, 2018

July 31, 2018
An adaptive semantic matching paradigm for reliable and valid language mapping in individuals with aphasia

We describe an adaptive semantic matching paradigm and demonstrate that it is a feasible, reliable and valid method for mapping language regions in people with aphasia.

Wilson SM, Yen M, Eriksson DK. An adaptive semantic matching paradigm for reliable and valid language mapping in individuals with aphasia. Hum Brain Mapp 2018; 39: 3285-307. [pdf]

June 14, 2018
Neural representation of vowel formants in tonotopic auditory cortex

Cortical encoding of vowels is scaffolded on tonotopy, a fundamental organizing principle of auditory cortex that is not language-specific.

Fisher JM, Dick FK, Levy DF, Wilson SM. Neural representation of vowel formants in tonotopic auditory cortex. NeuroImage 2018; 178: 574-82. [pdf]

February 12, 2018
Selective interference with syntactic encoding during sentence production by direct electrocortical stimulation of the inferior frontal gyrus

Direct cortical stimulation of the left inferior frontal gyrus can interfere with syntactic encoding but not single word processing, suggesting that this region plays an important role in the encoding of syntactic structure during sentence production.

Chang EF, Kurteff G, Wilson SM. Selective interference with syntactic encoding during sentence production by direct electrocortical stimulation of the inferior frontal gyrus. J Cogn Neurosci 2018; 30: 411-20. [pdf]

February 9, 2018
A quick aphasia battery for efficient, reliable, and multidimensional assessment of language function

The Quick Aphasia Battery (QAB) aims to provide a reliable and multidimensional assessment of language function in about a quarter of an hour, bridging the gap between comprehensive batteries and rapid screening instruments.

Wilson SM, Eriksson DK, Schneck SM, Lucanie JM. A quick aphasia battery for efficient, reliable, and multidimensional assessment of language function. PLOS ONE 2018; 13(2): e0192773. [pdf]

January 10, 2018
New paper

November 10, 2017
Society for the Neurobiology of Language, Baltimore, 2017

October 19, 2017
My brain in the form of chocolates

An amazing birthday gift from my lab members! Probably not the intended use of Vanderbilt's 3D printer...

September 20, 2017
Wernicke's model of language

Credit: Deborah Levy.

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